Advanced Search
MyIDEAS: Login to save this paper or follow this series

Sizing Up US Export Disincentives for a New Generation of National-Security Export Controls

Contents:

Author Info

  • J. David Richardson

    ()
    (Peterson Institute for International Economics)

  • Asha Sundaram

    ()
    (University of Cape Town, South Africa)

Abstract

In the early 1990s, US export controls that aimed to keep high-tech goods and technologies out of the hands of enemies deterred from $15 billion to $25 billion of such exports. Recent US export controls seem to deter US high-tech exports considerably less. As percentages of seven broad industrial categories of high-tech exports, estimated American export shortfalls from national security controls have fallen from roughly 5 percent in the early 1990s to slightly over 1 percent in the mid-to-late 2000s. Ongoing reform of American national-security export controls would seem to have only modest effects on the level of US high-tech exports. American exporters seem to have developed a distinctive competitive ability to shift their sales efforts flexibly among customers and products that are subject to tight, loose, and few controls. Important importing countries seem to have developed a distinctive ability to shift their sourcing flexibly among alternative suppliers, including a growing set of emerging exporters of high-tech goods. They are, however, still denied half of their potential high-tech imports from the ten exporters from which the authors draw their estimates.

Download Info

If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.
File URL: http://www.piie.com/publications/pb/pb13-13.pdf
Download Restriction: no

Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Peterson Institute for International Economics in its series Policy Briefs with number PB13-13.

as in new window
Length:
Date of creation: May 2013
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:iie:pbrief:pb13-13

Contact details of provider:
Postal: 1750 Massachusetts Avenue, NW, Washington, DC 20036-1903
Phone: 202-328-9000
Fax: 202-659-3225
Email:
Web page: http://www.piie.com
More information through EDIRC

Related research

Keywords:

This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:

References

References listed on IDEAS
Please report citation or reference errors to , or , if you are the registered author of the cited work, log in to your RePEc Author Service profile, click on "citations" and make appropriate adjustments.:
as in new window
  1. Marc J. Melitz & Daniel Trefler, 2012. "Gains from Trade When Firms Matter," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, American Economic Association, vol. 26(2), pages 91-118, Spring.
  2. Massimo Del Gatto & Filippo di Mauro & Joseph Gruber & Benjamin R. Mandel, 2011. "The revealed competitiveness of U.S. exports," International Finance Discussion Papers, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.) 1026, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.).
  3. C. Fred Bergsten, 1988. "America in the World Economy: A Strategy for the 1990s," Peterson Institute Press: All Books, Peterson Institute for International Economics, Peterson Institute for International Economics, number 80, July.
  4. Robert Koopman & William Powers & Zhi Wang & Shang-Jin Wei, 2011. "Give Credit where Credit is Due: Tracing Value Added in Global Production Chains," Working Papers 312011, Hong Kong Institute for Monetary Research.
  5. Dean, Judith & Fung, K.C. & Wang, Zhi, 2008. "How vertically specialized is Chinese trade?," BOFIT Discussion Papers, Bank of Finland, Institute for Economies in Transition 31/2008, Bank of Finland, Institute for Economies in Transition.
  6. Scott C. Bradford & Paul L. E. Grieco & Gary Clyde Hufbauer, 2006. "The Payoff to America from Globalisation," The World Economy, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 29(7), pages 893-916, 07.
  7. Asha Sundaram & J. David Richardson, 2013. "Peers and Tiers and US High-Tech Export Controls: A New Approach to Estimating Export Shortfalls," Working Paper Series, Peterson Institute for International Economics WP13-5, Peterson Institute for International Economics.
  8. Marcus Noland, 1996. "US-China Economic Relations," Working Paper Series, Peterson Institute for International Economics WP96-6, Peterson Institute for International Economics.
Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

Citations

Lists

This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

Statistics

Access and download statistics

Corrections

When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:iie:pbrief:pb13-13. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Peterson Institute webmaster).

If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.