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Phases of Economic Growth, 1850–1973

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  • Solomou,Solomos

Abstract

Solomos Solomou presents a clear and systematic examination of the evidence for long-term patterns of economic growth. Using data on Britain, France, Germany, the USA and the world economy between 1850 and 1973 he refutes the existence of long (Kondratieff) waves in the course of economic development. Instead he presents persuasive evidence for a growth pattern characterised by shock-induced, long-term variations in growth at the level of the world economy. The findings show that national patterns of growth did not necessarily coincide with those of the world economy, but followed episodic long swing fluctuations of twenty to thirty years before the Second World War and trend-accelerated growth in the post-war period. The author provides new historical perspectives on the pre-1913 era, the inter-war years and the post-war boom.

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Bibliographic Info

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This book is provided by Cambridge University Press in its series Cambridge Books with number 9780521389044 and published in 1990.

Order: http://www.cambridge.org/uk/catalogue/catalogue.asp?isbn=9780521389044
Handle: RePEc:cup:cbooks:9780521389044

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Web page: http://www.cambridge.org

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Cited by:
  1. Vincentas Giedraitis & Sarunas Girdenas, 2010. "Feeling The Heat: Financial Crises And Their Impact On Global Climate Change," Perspectives of Innovation in Economics and Business (PIEB), Prague Development Center, vol. 4(1), pages 7-10, February.
  2. Claude Diebolt & Cédric Doliger, 2008. "New international evidence on the cyclical behaviour of output: Kuznets swings reconsidered," Quality & Quantity: International Journal of Methodology, Springer, vol. 42(6), pages 719-737, December.
  3. Dimitri O. Ledenyov & Viktor O. Ledenyov, 2013. "On the accurate characterization of business cycles in nonlinear dynamic financial and economic systems," Papers 1304.4807, arXiv.org.
  4. Albers, Scott, 2012. "Predicting crises: Five essays on the mathematic prediction of economic and social crises," MPRA Paper 43484, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  5. Fardoust, Shahrokh & Dhareshwar, Ashok, 2013. "Some thoughts on making long-term forecasts for the world economy," Policy Research Working Paper Series 6705, The World Bank.
  6. Albers, Scott & Albers, Andrew L., 2012. "On the mathematic prediction of economic and social crises: toward a harmonic interpretation of the Kondratiev wave," MPRA Paper 37771, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  7. Allan Timmermann & Luis Catão & Marco Aiolfi, 2006. "Common Factors in Latin America's Business Cycles," IMF Working Papers 06/49, International Monetary Fund.
  8. Solomou, Solomos & Shimazaki, Masao, 2007. "Japanese episodic long swings in economic growth," Explorations in Economic History, Elsevier, vol. 44(2), pages 224-241, April.

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