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Physical inactivity and its impact on healthcare utilization

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  • Nazmi Sari

    (Department of Economics & SPHERU, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Sask., Canada)

Abstract

Physically inactive people are expected to use more healthcare services than active people. This inactivity imposes costs on the collectively funded health insurance programs. In this paper, excess utilization of healthcare services due to physical inactivity is examined using count data models and the Canadian Community Health Survey. The aim of the paper is to estimate utilization of healthcare services associated with inactivity and to estimate its impact on the Canadian healthcare system. The results suggest that physical inactivity increases hospital stays, and use of physician and nurse services. On average, an inactive person spends 38% more days in hospital than an active person. S|he also uses 5.5% more family physician visits, 13% more specialist services, and 12% more nurse visits than an active individual. The subsequent social cost of inactivity for the healthcare system is substantial. Copyright © 2008 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

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File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1002/hec.1408
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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. in its journal Health Economics.

Volume (Year): 18 (2009)
Issue (Month): 8 ()
Pages: 885-901

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Handle: RePEc:wly:hlthec:v:18:y:2009:i:8:p:885-901

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Web page: http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/cgi-bin/jhome/5749

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Cited by:
  1. Lechner, Michael & Sari, Nazmi, 2014. "Labor market effects of sports and exercise: Evidence from Canadian panel data," Economics Working Paper Series 1402, University of St. Gallen, School of Economics and Political Science.
  2. Humphreys, Brad & Maresova, Katerina & Ruseski, Jane, 2012. "Institutional Factors, Sport Policy, and Individual Sport Participation: An International Comparison," Working Papers 2012-1, University of Alberta, Department of Economics.
  3. Gregori Baetschmann & Rainer Winkelmann, 2012. "Modelling zero-inflated count data when exposure varies: with an application to sick leave," ECON - Working Papers, Department of Economics - University of Zurich 061, Department of Economics - University of Zurich.
  4. Markus Jochmann, 2009. "What Belongs Where? Variable Selection for Zero-Inflated Count Models with an Application to the Demand for Health Care," Working Paper Series, The Rimini Centre for Economic Analysis 45_09, The Rimini Centre for Economic Analysis, revised Jan 2009.
  5. John Mullahy & Stephanie Robert, 2010. "No time to lose: time constraints and physical activity in the production of health," Review of Economics of the Household, Springer, Springer, vol. 8(4), pages 409-432, December.
  6. Gregori Baetschmann & Rainer Winkelmann, 2014. "A Dynamic Hurdle Model for Zero-Inflated Count Data: With an Application to Health Care Utilization," SOEPpapers on Multidisciplinary Panel Data Research 648, DIW Berlin, The German Socio-Economic Panel (SOEP).
  7. Gregori Baetschmann & Rainer Winkelmann, 2014. "A dynamic hurdle model for zero-inflated count data: with an application to health care utilization," ECON - Working Papers, Department of Economics - University of Zurich 151, Department of Economics - University of Zurich.
  8. Wicker, Pamela & Hallmann, Kirstin & Breuer, Christoph, 2013. "Analyzing the impact of sport infrastructure on sport participation using geo-coded data: Evidence from multi-level models," Sport Management Review, Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 16(1), pages 54-67.
  9. Jochmann, Markus, 2009. "What Belongs Where? Variable Selection for Zero-Inflated Count Models with an Application to the Demand for Health Care," SIRE Discussion Papers, Scottish Institute for Research in Economics (SIRE) 2009-54, Scottish Institute for Research in Economics (SIRE).

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