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Trust in Others: Does Religion Matter?

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Author Info

  • Joseph Daniels
  • Marc von der Ruhr

Abstract

Though the recent literature offers intuitively appealing bases for, and evidence of, a linkage among religious beliefs, religious participation and economic outcomes, evidence on a relationship between religion and trust is mixed. By allowing for an attendance effect, disaggregating Protestant denominations, and using a more extensive data set, probit models of the General Social Survey (GSS), 1975 through 2000, show that black Protestants, Pentecostals, fundamentalist Protestants, and Catholics, trust others less than individuals who do not claim a preference for a particular denomination. For conservative denominations the effect of religion is through affiliation, not attendance. In contrast, liberal Protestants trust others more and this effect is reinforced by attendance. The impact of religion on moderate Protestants is only through attendance, as frequency of attendance increases trust of others while the denomination effect is insignificant.

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File URL: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/00346760902968447
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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Taylor & Francis Journals in its journal Review of Social Economy.

Volume (Year): 68 (2010)
Issue (Month): 2 ()
Pages: 163-186

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Handle: RePEc:taf:rsocec:v:68:y:2010:i:2:p:163-186

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Keywords: religion; social trust;

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  1. What does religion do?
    by chris dillow in Stumbling and Mumbling on 2011-12-18 11:25:56
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Cited by:
  1. Adeline Delavande & Basit Zafar, 2011. "Stereotypes and madrassas: experimental evidence from Pakistan," Staff Reports 501, Federal Reserve Bank of New York.
  2. Berggren, Niclas & Bjørnskov, Christian, 2009. "Is the Importance of Religion in Daily Life Related to Social Trust? Cross-Country and Cross-State Comparisons," Ratio Working Papers 142, The Ratio Institute.

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