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The Scope and Promising Future of Social Economics

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Author Info

  • Jon Wisman

Abstract

This essay explores the future potential for Social Economics. Since the beginning of modern economics, the mainstream has been steered by what might be called a material progress vision, whereby the generally unacknowledged pesumption is that economic growth will make the good life possible. Accordingly, such potential components of human welfare as more creative and fulfilling work, greater equality in the distribution of opportunity, wealth and income, and a greater degree of community can be more or less ignored for the present. Less guided by this vision, and unfettered by a pretense of value-neutrality, Social Economics does not view such components of welfare as subsidiary to economic growth. Instead, it is more focused upon the wholeness of social life, more concerned with the full requisites of the good and just society. By drawing upon recent work in psychology, sociology, and especially happiness research, Social Economics is found to offer a more promising orientation towards future economic concerns than does mainstream economics.

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File URL: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/0034676032000160886
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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Taylor & Francis Journals in its journal Review of Social Economy.

Volume (Year): 61 (2003)
Issue (Month): 4 ()
Pages: 425-445

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Handle: RePEc:taf:rsocec:v:61:y:2003:i:4:p:425-445

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Related research

Keywords: Economic visions; happiness; work; community; justice;

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Cited by:
  1. Anna Carabelli & Mario Cedrini, 2011. "The Economic Problem of Happiness: Keynes on Happiness and Economics," Forum for Social Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 40(3), pages 335-359, January.
  2. Jon D. Wisman & Kevin Capehart, 2009. "Creative Destruction, Economic Insecurity, Stress and Epidemic Obesity," Working Papers 2009-13 JEL classificatio, American University, Department of Economics.
  3. Jon D. Wisman, 2013. "Why Marx Still Matters," Working Papers 2013-06, American University, Department of Economics.
  4. Jon D. Wisman, 2012. "The Growth Trap, Ecological Devastation, and the Promise of Guaranteed Employment," Working Papers 2012-17, American University, Department of Economics.
  5. Jon D. Wisman & Matthew Davis, 2011. "Degraded Work, Declining Community, Rising Inequality, and the Transformation of the Protestant Ethic in America: 1870-1930," Working Papers 2011-08, American University, Department of Economics.

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