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Unemployment and earnings for second generation immigrants in Sweden. Ethnic background and parent composition

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  • Dan-Olof Rooth

    ()

  • Jan Ekberg

    ()

Abstract

This study sheds light on the labour market outcomes of children born to immigrants in the destination country, i.e. second generation immigrants. The study has the advantage of being able to (i) identify several different ethnic backgrounds and (ii) identify the parent composition, i.e. whether one or both parents of the individual are foreign born. The labour market outcomes of second generation immigrants mirror those of first generation immigrants in that we find heterogeneity in labour market outcomes to be associated with ethnic background. Moreover, these outcomes, especially for Southern and non-European backgrounds, are much worse than those for native-born with a Swedish background. Finally, the outcome is more favourable if one parent is born in Sweden compared to having both parents foreign born, especially if the mother is native born. Copyright Springer-Verlag 2003

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Springer in its journal Population Economics.

Volume (Year): 16 (2003)
Issue (Month): 4 (November)
Pages: 787-814

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Handle: RePEc:spr:jopoec:v:16:y:2003:i:4:p:787-814

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Related research

Keywords: J15; J24; J61; J71; Second generation immigrants; discrimination; human capital formation;

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  1. Går utanförskap i arv?
    by grafstrom in migro on 2012-09-18 08:53:28
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Cited by:
  1. Christian Dustmann & Nikolaos Theodoropoulos, 2006. "Ethnic Minority Immigrants and their Children in Britain," CReAM Discussion Paper Series 0610, Centre for Research and Analysis of Migration (CReAM), Department of Economics, University College London.
  2. Nordin, Martin & Rooth, Dan-Olof, 2007. "The Income Gap Between Natives and Second Generation Immigrants in Sweden: Is Skill the Explanation?," IZA Discussion Papers 2759, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  3. Hammarstedt, Mats, 2007. "Intergenerational mobility among three generations of immigrants in Sweden," CAFO Working Papers, Centre for Labour Market Policy Research (CAFO), School of Business and Economics, Linnaeus University 2007:4, Centre for Labour Market Policy Research (CAFO), School of Business and Economics, Linnaeus University.
  4. Abdurrahman Aydemir & Wen-Hao Chen & Miles Corak, 2013. "Intergenerational Education Mobility among the Children of Canadian Immigrants," Canadian Public Policy, University of Toronto Press, vol. 39(s1), pages 107-122, May.
  5. Ekberg, Jan & Hammarstedt, Mats & Shukur, Ghazi, 2007. "SUR estimation of earnings differentials between three generations of immigrants and natives," CAFO Working Papers, Centre for Labour Market Policy Research (CAFO), School of Business and Economics, Linnaeus University 2007:7, Centre for Labour Market Policy Research (CAFO), School of Business and Economics, Linnaeus University.
  6. Aycan, Çelikaksoy & Lena, Nekby & Saman, Rashid, 2009. "Assortative Mating by Ethnic Background and Education in Sweden: The Role of Parental Composition on Partner Choice," SULCIS Working Papers 2009:7, Stockholm University Linnaeus Center for Integration Studies - SULCIS.
  7. Chen, Wen-Hao & Aydemir, Abdurrahman & Corak, Miles, 2005. "Mobilite intergenerationnelle des gains chez les enfants des immigrants au Canada," Direction des etudes analytiques : documents de recherche 2005267f, Statistics Canada, Direction des etudes analytiques.
  8. Quintini, Glenda & Martin, John P. & Martin, Sébastien, 2007. "The Changing Nature of the School-to-Work Transition Process in OECD Countries," IZA Discussion Papers 2582, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  9. Hammarstedt , Mats & Palme, MÃ¥rten, 2006. "Intergenerational Mobility, Human Capital Transmission and the Earnings of Second-Generation Immigrants in Sweden," Research Papers in Economics, Stockholm University, Department of Economics 2006:2, Stockholm University, Department of Economics.
  10. Sweetman, Arthur & van Ours, Jan C., 2014. "Immigration: What about the Children and Grandchildren?," IZA Discussion Papers 7919, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  11. Lars Behrenz & Mats Hammarstedt & Jonas M�nsson, 2007. "Second-Generation Immigrants in the Swedish Labour Market," International Review of Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 21(1), pages 157-174.
  12. Rooth, Dan-Olof, 2010. "Automatic associations and discrimination in hiring: Real world evidence," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 17(3), pages 523-534, June.
  13. Christian Dustmann & Albrecht Glitz, 2011. "Migration and Education," CReAM Discussion Paper Series 1105, Centre for Research and Analysis of Migration (CReAM), Department of Economics, University College London.
  14. Rooth, Dan-Olof, 2007. "Implicit Discrimination in Hiring: Real World Evidence," IZA Discussion Papers 2764, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  15. World Demographic and Ageing Forum & David Bell & Alison Bowes & Axel Heitmueller, 2007. "Did the Introduction of Free Personal Care in Scotland in a Reduction of Informal Care?," Journal Article y:2007:i:1, World Demographic and Ageing Forum.
  16. Mats Hammarstedt & MÃ¥rten Palme, 2012. "Human capital transmission and the earnings of second-generation immigrants in Sweden," IZA Journal of Migration, Springer, Springer, vol. 1(1), pages 1-23, December.
  17. Katz, Katarina & Österberg, Torun, 2013. "Wages of childhood immigrants in Sweden – education, returns to education and overeducation," Working Paper Series, IFAU - Institute for Evaluation of Labour Market and Education Policy 2013:8, IFAU - Institute for Evaluation of Labour Market and Education Policy.

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