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Gender Discrimination in Job Ads: Evidence from China

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  • Peter Kuhn
  • Kailing Shen

Abstract

We study explicit gender discrimination in a population of ads on a Chinese Internet job board. Gender-targeted job ads are common, favor women as often as men, and are much less common in jobs requiring higher levels of skill. Employers' relative preferences for female versus male workers, on the other hand, are more strongly related to the preferred age, height, and beauty of the worker than to job skill levels. Almost two thirds of the variation in advertised gender preferences occurs within firms, and one third occurs within firmoccupation cells. Overall, these patterns are not well explained by a firm-level animus model, by a glass-ceiling model, or by models in which broad occupational categories are consistently gendered across firms. Instead, the patterns suggest a model in which firms have idiosyncratic preferences for particular job-gender matches, which are overridden in skilled positions by factors such as thinner labor markets or a greater incentive to search broadly for the most qualified candidate. JEL Codes: J16, J63, J71. Copyright 2013, Oxford University Press.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Oxford University Press in its journal The Quarterly Journal of Economics.

Volume (Year): 128 (2013)
Issue (Month): 1 ()
Pages: 287-336

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Handle: RePEc:oup:qjecon:v:128:y:2013:i:1:p:287-336

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Cited by:
  1. Jeff Biddle & Daniel Hamermesh, 2013. "Wage discrimination over the business cycle," IZA Journal of Labor Policy, Springer, vol. 2(1), pages 1-19, December.
  2. Eva O. Arceo-Gomez & Raymundo M. Campos-Vazquez, 2013. "Race and Marriage in the Labor Market: A Discrimination Correspondence Study in a Developing Country," Serie documentos de trabajo del Centro de Estudios Económicos 2013-03, El Colegio de México, Centro de Estudios Económicos.
  3. Annabelle Krause & Ulf Rinne & Klaus Zimmermann, 2012. "Anonymous job applications in Europe," IZA Journal of European Labor Studies, Springer, vol. 1(1), pages 1-20, December.

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