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The dynamics of resource-based economic development: evidence from Australia and Norway

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  • Simon Ville
  • Olav Wicken

Abstract

Australia and Norway have achieved modern levels of development as resource-based economies, thus avoiding the so-called resource curse. Their ability to achieve this rested heavily on repeated diversification into new resource products and industries. These processes relied largely on innovation, confirming the close ties that have existed between resource-based industries and knowledge-producing and disseminating sectors of society. We develop a resource-based diversification model that analyses the interaction between "enabling sectors" and resource industries and apply it to the historical experience of the two countries. Copyright 2013 The Author 2012. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Associazione ICC. All rights reserved., Oxford University Press.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Oxford University Press in its journal Industrial and Corporate Change.

Volume (Year): 22 (2013)
Issue (Month): 5 (October)
Pages: 1341-1371

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Handle: RePEc:oup:indcch:v:22:y:2013:i:5:p:1341-1371

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  1. Halvor Mehlum & Karl Moene & Ragnar Torvik, 2006. "Institutions and the Resource Curse," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, Royal Economic Society, vol. 116(508), pages 1-20, 01.
  2. David Merrett & Stephen Morgan & Simon Ville, 2008. "Industry associations as facilitators of social capital: The establishment and early operations of the Melbourne Woolbrokers Association," Business History, Taylor & Francis Journals, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 50(6), pages 781-794.
  3. Ian W. McLean, 2005. "Why Was Australia So Rich?," Development and Comp Systems, EconWPA 0509003, EconWPA.
  4. Jeffrey D. Sachs & Andrew M. Warner, 1995. "Natural Resource Abundance and Economic Growth," NBER Working Papers 5398, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  5. Ville,Simon, 2010. "The Rural Entrepreneurs," Cambridge Books, Cambridge University Press, Cambridge University Press, number 9780521125949.
  6. David Greasley & Jakob B. Madsen, 2010. "Curse and Boon: Natural Resources and Long-Run Growth in Currently Rich Economies," The Economic Record, The Economic Society of Australia, The Economic Society of Australia, vol. 86(274), pages 311-328, 09.
  7. Greasley, David & Oxley, Les, 2010. "Knowledge, natural resource abundance and economic development: Lessons from New Zealand 1861-1939," Explorations in Economic History, Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 47(4), pages 443-459, October.
  8. repec:fth:stanho:e-92-3 is not listed on IDEAS
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