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Distance to Hospital and Children's Use of Preventive Care: Is Being Closer Better, and for Whom?

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  • Janet Currie
  • Patricia B. Reagan

Abstract

This article examines the effect of distance to hospital on preventive care among children using data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth's Child-Mother file matched to data from the 1990 American Hospital Association Survey. Among central-city black children, each additional mile from the hospital is associated with a 3-percentage-point decline in the probability of having had a checkup (from a mean baseline of 74%). Moreover, the effects are similar for privately and publicly insured black children. For this group, access to providers is as important as private insurance coverage in predicting use of preventive care. (JEL I1) Copyright 2003, Oxford University Press.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Western Economic Association International in its journal Economic Inquiry.

Volume (Year): 41 (2003)
Issue (Month): 3 (July)
Pages: 378-391

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Handle: RePEc:oup:ecinqu:v:41:y:2003:i:3:p:378-391

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Cited by:
  1. Burkey, M.L. & Bhadury, J. & Eiselt, H.A., 2012. "A location-based comparison of health care services in four U.S. states with efficiency and equity," Socio-Economic Planning Sciences, Elsevier, vol. 46(2), pages 157-163.
  2. M. Kate Bundorf & Laurence Baker & Sara Singer & Todd Wagner, 2004. "Consumer Demand for Health Information on the Internet," NBER Working Papers 10386, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  3. Buchmueller, Thomas C. & Jacobson, Mireille & Wold, Cheryl, 2006. "How far to the hospital?: The effect of hospital closures on access to care," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 25(4), pages 740-761, July.
  4. Nancy E. Reichman & Hope Corman & Kelly Noonan & Dhaval Dave, 2009. "Infant health production functions: what a difference the data make," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 18(7), pages 761-782.
  5. Rossin-Slater, Maya, 2013. "WIC in your neighborhood: New evidence on the impacts of geographic access to clinics," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 102(C), pages 51-69.
  6. Mark Burkey, 2012. "Decomposing geographic accessibility into component parts: methods and an application to hospitals," The Annals of Regional Science, Springer, vol. 48(3), pages 783-800, June.

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