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The Cambridge School of Keynesian Economics

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  • Luigi L. Pasinetti
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    Abstract

    There have been strong ties between the Cambridge Journal of Economics (CJE) and the Cambridge School of Keynesian Economics, from the very beginning. In this paper, the author investigates the environment that saw the birth of the CJE at Cambridge (UK), in 1977, and the relationship that linked it to the direct pupils of Keynes. A critical question is explicitly examined: why didn't the 'Keynesian revolution' succeed in becoming a permanent winning paradigm? Some behavioural mistakes of the members of the Keynesian School may explain this lack of success, but only to a certain extent. In any case, there were and there still are remedies too. But what we are inheriting is a unique set of analytical building blocks (the paper lists eight of them) that makes this School of economics a viable (and in some directions definitely superior) alternative to mainstream economics. Admittedly, there is some important work still to be done. The paper highlights the need for a two-stage approach, addressing pure theory and extensive institutional analysis. It is argued that a combination of the two would strengthen the coherence of the theoretical foundations, and at the same time would provide a fruitful extension of economic analysis to empirical, institutional and economic dynamics investigations. Copyright 2005, Oxford University Press.

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    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1093/cje/bei073
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    Bibliographic Info

    Article provided by Oxford University Press in its journal Cambridge Journal of Economics.

    Volume (Year): 29 (2005)
    Issue (Month): 6 (November)
    Pages: 837-848

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    Handle: RePEc:oup:cambje:v:29:y:2005:i:6:p:837-848

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    Cited by:
    1. Lukáš Kovanda, 2011. "The Future of Economics: Four Possible Scenarios," Politická ekonomie, University of Economics, Prague, vol. 2011(6), pages 743-758.
    2. Kronenberg, Tobias, 2010. "Finding common ground between ecological economics and post-Keynesian economics," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 69(7), pages 1488-1494, May.
    3. Wynne Godley & Marc Lavoie, 2006. "Prolegomena to Realistic Monetary Macroeconomics: A Theory of Intelligible Sequences," Economics Working Paper Archive wp_441, Levy Economics Institute, The.
    4. Araujo, Ricardo Azevedo & Teixeira, Joanílio Rodolpho, 2011. "A multi-sector version of the Post-Keynesian growth model," MPRA Paper 30331, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    5. Lukáš Kovanda, 2010. "Critical Realism as an Ontological Basis of Post-Keynesianism," Politická ekonomie, University of Economics, Prague, vol. 2010(5), pages 608-622.
    6. Villemeur, Alain, 2010. "Economic growth : a chain-reaction between increases in supply and increases in demand ?," Economics Papers from University Paris Dauphine 123456789/6516, Paris Dauphine University.
    7. Garbellini, Nadia & Wirkierman, Ariel Luis, 2010. "Pasinetti’s Structural Change and Economic Growth: a conceptual excursus," MPRA Paper 25685, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    8. Clive L. Spash, 2012. "Ecological Economics and Philosophy of Science: Ontology, Epistemology, Methodology and Ideology," SRE-Disc sre-disc-2012_03, Institute for the Environment and Regional Development, Department of Socioeconomics, Vienna University of Economics and Business.
    9. Nuno Ornelas Martins, 2012. "Mathematics, Science and the Cambridge Tradition," Economic Thought, World Economics Association, vol. 1(2), pages 2, December.
    10. Timothy C. Johnson, 2013. "Reciprocity as the foundation of Financial Economics," Papers 1310.2798, arXiv.org.
    11. Dirk J. Bezemer, 2012. "Modelos contables y comprensión de la crisis financiera," Revista de Economía Institucional, Universidad Externado de Colombia - Facultad de Economía, vol. 14(26), pages 47-76, January-J.
    12. Kronenberg, Tobias, 2010. "Dematerialisation of consumption: a win-win strategy?," MPRA Paper 25704, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    13. Bezemer, Dirk J., 2010. "Understanding financial crisis through accounting models," Accounting, Organizations and Society, Elsevier, vol. 35(7), pages 676-688, October.
    14. Araujo, Ricardo & Trigg, Andrew, 2013. "A Neo-Kaldorian Approach to Structural Economic Dynamics," MPRA Paper 50370, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    15. Araujo, Ricardo Azevedo & Teixeira, Joanílio Rodolpho, 2011. "Decisions on investment allocation in the post-Keynesian growth models," MPRA Paper 33639, University Library of Munich, Germany.

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