Advanced Search
MyIDEAS: Login

Sargent versus Simon: Bounded Rationality Unbound

Contents:

Author Info

  • Sent, Esther-Mirjam

Abstract

T. J. Sargent called his latest venture Bounded Rationality in Macroeconomics and tried to make connections with H. A. Simon's program of bounded rationality and artificial intelligence. The irony is that rational expectations theory, born from the same mother--Carnegie Mellon University--as bounded rationality, after trying to kill her big sister, then apparently came around to embracing her in the person of Sargent. But was Simon's interpretation of bounded rationality the same as Sargent's? Did Simon and Sargent mean the same by artificial intelligence? Not quite. The different interests of Sargent and Simon resulted in vastly different interpretations of bounded rationality and artificial intelligence. Copyright 1997 by Oxford University Press.

Download Info

To our knowledge, this item is not available for download. To find whether it is available, there are three options:
1. Check below under "Related research" whether another version of this item is available online.
2. Check on the provider's web page whether it is in fact available.
3. Perform a search for a similarly titled item that would be available.

Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Oxford University Press in its journal Cambridge Journal of Economics.

Volume (Year): 21 (1997)
Issue (Month): 3 (May)
Pages: 323-38

as in new window
Handle: RePEc:oup:cambje:v:21:y:1997:i:3:p:323-38

Contact details of provider:
Postal: Oxford University Press, Great Clarendon Street, Oxford OX2 6DP, UK
Fax: 01865 267 985
Email:
Web page: http://www.cje.oupjournals.org/

Order Information:
Web: http://www.oup.co.uk/journals

Related research

Keywords:

References

No references listed on IDEAS
You can help add them by filling out this form.

Citations

Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
as in new window

Cited by:
  1. Hosseini, Hamid, 2003. "The arrival of behavioral economics: from Michigan, or the Carnegie School in the 1950s and the early 1960s?," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 32(4), pages 391-409, September.
  2. Richard Holt & J. Barkley Rosser & David Colander, 2011. "The Complexity Era in Economics," Review of Political Economy, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 23(3), pages 357-369.
  3. Duo Qin, 2006. "VAR Modelling Approach and Cowles Commission Heritage," Working Papers 557, Queen Mary, University of London, School of Economics and Finance.
  4. Lages, André Maia Gomes, 2006. "A Contribuição Singular de Simon e sua Repercussão Teórica Relevante
    [Simon's Unique Contribution and Its Relevant Theoretical Impact]
    ," MPRA Paper 31182, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised 21 Mar 2006.
  5. Sent, Esther-Mirjam, 2004. "The legacy of Herbert Simon in game theory," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 53(3), pages 303-317, March.
  6. Stephen Dunn, 2000. "Fundamental Uncertainty and the Firm in the Long Run," Review of Political Economy, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 12(4), pages 419-433.
  7. Scott Moss, 1997. "Boundedly versus Procedurally Rational Expectations," Discussion Papers 97-30, Manchester Metropolitan University, Centre for Policy Modelling.

Lists

This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

Statistics

Access and download statistics

Corrections

When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:oup:cambje:v:21:y:1997:i:3:p:323-38. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Oxford University Press) or (Christopher F. Baum).

If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.