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Bank Asset Liquidation and the Propagation of the U.S. Great Depression

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  • Anari, Ali
  • Kolari, James
  • Mason, Joseph
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    Abstract

    We hypothesize that financial disintermediation during and after the Great Depression arose from the slow liquidation of failed-bank deposits. Empirical results from incorporating the stock of failed national bank deposits for the period 1921-40 in vector autoregression (VAR) models suggest that the stock of deposits in closed banks undergoing liquidation is as important as money stock in terms of explaining output changes over forecast horizons from one to three years. Hence, we infer that the dynamic effects of banking sector shocks were cumulative and pervasive during and after the Depression.

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    Bibliographic Info

    Article provided by Blackwell Publishing in its journal Journal of Money, Credit and Banking.

    Volume (Year): 37 (2005)
    Issue (Month): 4 (August)
    Pages: 753-73

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    Handle: RePEc:mcb:jmoncb:v:37:y:2005:i:4:p:753-73

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    Web page: http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/journal.asp?ref=0022-2879

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    Cited by:
    1. Abildgren, Kim, 2012. "Business cycles, monetary transmission and shocks to financial stability: empirical evidence from a new set of Danish quarterly national accounts 1948-2010," Working Paper Series 1458, European Central Bank.
    2. Shin-ichi Fukuda & Munehisa Kasuya & Kentaro Akashi, 2008. "Impaired Bank Health and Default Risk," CIRJE F-Series CIRJE-F-564, CIRJE, Faculty of Economics, University of Tokyo.
    3. Mark Carlson, 2008. "Alternatives for distressed banks and the panics of the Great Depression," Finance and Economics Discussion Series 2008-07, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.).
    4. DeYoung, Robert & Kowalik, Michal & Reidhill, Jack, 2013. "A theory of failed bank resolution: Technological change and political economics," Journal of Financial Stability, Elsevier, vol. 9(4), pages 612-627.
    5. James M. Nason & Ellis W. Tallman, 2012. "Business Cycles and Financial Crises: The Roles of Credit Supply and Demand Shocks," CAMA Working Papers 2012-44, Centre for Applied Macroeconomic Analysis, Crawford School of Public Policy, The Australian National University.
    6. Cangemi, Robert R. & Mason, Joseph R. & Pagano, Michael S., 2012. "Options-based structural model estimation of bond recovery rates," Journal of Financial Intermediation, Elsevier, vol. 21(3), pages 473-506.
    7. Charles W. Calomiris & Stanley D. Longhofer & William Miles, 2008. "The Foreclosure-House Price Nexus: Lessons from the 2007-2008 Housing Turmoil," NBER Working Papers 14294, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    8. Liu, Wei & Kolari, James W. & Kyle Tippens, T. & Fraser, Donald R., 2013. "Did capital infusions enhance bank recovery from the great recession?," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 37(12), pages 5048-5061.
    9. Shin-ichi Fukuda & Munehisa Kasuya & Kentaro Akashi, 2008. "Impaired Bank Health and Default Risk ( Forthcoming in "Pacific-Basin Finance Journal". )," CARF F-Series CARF-F-122, Center for Advanced Research in Finance, Faculty of Economics, The University of Tokyo.
    10. Kupiec, Paul H. & Ramirez, Carlos D., 2013. "Bank failures and the cost of systemic risk: Evidence from 1900 to 1930," Journal of Financial Intermediation, Elsevier, vol. 22(3), pages 285-307.

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