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Under Two Flags: Symbolic Voting in the State of Mississippi

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  • G–khan R. Karahan
  • William F. Shughart II

Abstract

Participants in a special election held in the State of Mississippi on April 17, 2001, voted overwhelmingly against changing the design of the state's flag, which incorporates a symbol of the Confederacy. The determinants of voting on the flag are analyzed and turnout rates in April 2001 are compared with those for recent gubernatorial and presidential elections. We find that the flag vote divided Mississippians sharply along lines of race, class and political ideology. A key empirical implication is that voter positions in issue space tend to be more polarized when political choices have expressive as opposed to instrumental consequences.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Springer in its journal Public Choice.

Volume (Year): 118 (2004)
Issue (Month): 1_2 (01)
Pages: 105-124

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Handle: RePEc:kap:pubcho:v:118:y:2004:i:1_2:p:105-124

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Web page: http://www.springerlink.com/link.asp?id=100332

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Cited by:
  1. Alan Hamlin & Colin Jennings, 2009. "Expressive Political Behaviour: Foundations, Scope and Implications," Working Papers 0918, University of Strathclyde Business School, Department of Economics.
  2. Michael Reksulak & William Shughart, 2008. "Taxonomy: racism versus fiscal conservatism in voting on segregationist provisions in Alabama’s constitution," Constitutional Political Economy, Springer, vol. 19(1), pages 61-80, March.
  3. Michael Reksulak & Gökhan Karahan & William Shughart, 2007. "Flags of our fathers: Voting on Confederate symbols in the State of Georgia," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 131(1), pages 83-99, April.
  4. Hillman, Arye L., 2010. "Expressive behavior in economics and politics," European Journal of Political Economy, Elsevier, vol. 26(4), pages 403-418, December.
  5. Jeffrey Grynaviski & Michael Munger, 2014. "Did southerners favor slavery? Inferences from an analysis of prices in New Orleans, 1805–1860," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 159(3), pages 341-361, June.

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