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Partnering with the Pinoleville Pomo Nation: Co-Design Methodology Case Study for Creating Sustainable, Culturally Inspired Renewable Energy Systems and Infrastructure

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  • Ryan Shelby

    ()
    (Community Assessment of Renewable Energy and Sustainability (CARES) Lab, University of California, Berkeley, 450 Sutardja Dai Hall, Mail Box #17, Berkeley, CA 94720-1758, USA)

  • Yael Perez

    ()
    (Community Assessment of Renewable Energy and Sustainability (CARES) Lab, University of California, Berkeley, 450 Sutardja Dai Hall, Mail Box #17, Berkeley, CA 94720-1758, USA)

  • Alice Agogino

    ()
    (Community Assessment of Renewable Energy and Sustainability (CARES) Lab, University of California, Berkeley, 450 Sutardja Dai Hall, Mail Box #17, Berkeley, CA 94720-1758, USA)

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    Abstract

    This paper describes the co-design methodology created by the authors to partner with communities that have historical trauma associated with working with outsiders on projects that involved substantial use of engineering and science—renewable energy technologies, for example—that have not integrated their value system or has been historically denied to them. As a case study, we present the lessons learned from a partnership with the Pinoleville Pomo Nation (PPN) of Ukiah, CA and UC Berkeley’s Community Assessment of Renewable Energy and Sustainability (CARES) team to develop sustainable housing that utilizes sustainability best practices and renewable energy technology as well as reflect the long-standing culture and traditions of the PPN. We also present the Pomo-inspired housing design created by this partnership and illustrate how Native American nations can partner with universities and other academic organizations to utilize engineering expertise to co-design solutions that address the needs of the tribes.

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    Bibliographic Info

    Article provided by MDPI, Open Access Journal in its journal Sustainability.

    Volume (Year): 4 (2012)
    Issue (Month): 5 (April)
    Pages: 794-818

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    Handle: RePEc:gam:jsusta:v:4:y:2012:i:5:p:794-818:d:17393

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    Related research

    Keywords: Native American; indigenous people; sustainability; renewable energy; co-design;

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    1. Griffin, Abbie. & Hauser, John R., 1991. "The voice of the customer," Working papers #56-91. Working paper (Sl, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), Sloan School of Management.
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