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An overview of consumer data and credit reporting

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Author Info

  • Robert B. Avery
  • Paul S. Calem
  • Glenn B. Canner
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    Abstract

    For some time, the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System has sought to obtain more detailed and timely information on the debt status, loan payment behavior, and overall credit quality of U.S. consumers. For decades, information of this type has been gathered by credit reporting companies primarily to assist creditors in evaluating the credit quality of current and prospective customers. To evaluate the potential usefulness of these data, the Federal Reserve Board engaged one of the three national consumer reporting companies to supply the credit records, without personal identifying information, of a nationally representative sample of individuals. This article describes the way the credit reporting companies compile and report their data and gives background on the regulatory structure governing these activities. This description is followed by a detailed look at the information collected in credit reports. Key aspects of the data that may be incomplete, duplicative, or ambiguous as they apply to credit evaluation are highlighted in the analysis. The article concludes with a discussion of steps that might be taken to address some of the issues identified. ; Also identified as FRB Philadelphia Payment Cards Center Discussion Paper 03-03

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    File URL: http://www.federalreserve.gov/pubs/bulletin/2003/0203lead.pdf
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    Bibliographic Info

    Article provided by Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.) in its journal Federal Reserve Bulletin.

    Volume (Year): (2003)
    Issue (Month): Feb ()
    Pages: 47-73

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    Handle: RePEc:fip:fedgrb:y:2003:i:feb:p:47-73:n:v.89no.2

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    Related research

    Keywords: Credit cards ; Consumer behavior;

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    Cited by:
    1. Ashlyn Aiko Nelson, 2010. "Credit scores, race, and residential sorting," Journal of Policy Analysis and Management, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 29(1), pages 39-68.
    2. Avery, Robert B. & Calem, Paul S. & Canner, Glenn B., 2004. "Consumer credit scoring: Do situational circumstances matter?," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 28(4), pages 835-856, April.
    3. Irina Barakova & Raphael Bostic & Paul Calem & Susan Wachter, . "Does Credit Quality Matter for Homeownership?," Zell/Lurie Center Working Papers 410, Wharton School Samuel Zell and Robert Lurie Real Estate Center, University of Pennsylvania.
    4. Meier, Stephan & Sprenger, Charles D., 2013. "Discounting financial literacy: Time preferences and participation in financial education programs," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 95(C), pages 159-174.
    5. Jonathan Spader, 2010. "Beyond Disparate Impact: Risk-based Pricing and Disparity in Consumer Credit History Scores," The Review of Black Political Economy, Springer, vol. 37(2), pages 61-78, June.
    6. Paul S. Calem & Michael B. Gordy & Loretta J. Mester, 2005. "Switching costs and adverse selection in the market for credit cards: new evidence," Working Papers 05-16, Federal Reserve Bank of Philadelphia.
    7. Sumit Agarwal & Souphala Chomsisengphet & Lawrence Mielnicki, 2008. "Do Forbearance Plans Help Mitigate Credit Card Losses?," Journal of Family and Economic Issues, Springer, vol. 29(2), pages 191-201, June.
    8. Finkelstein, Amy, et al., 2011. "The Oregon Health Insurance Experiment: Evidence from the First Year," Working Paper Series rwp11-040, Harvard University, John F. Kennedy School of Government.
    9. Stephan Meier & Charles Sprenger, 2007. "Impatience and credit behavior: evidence from a field experiment," Working Papers 07-3, Federal Reserve Bank of Boston.
    10. Khandani, Amir E. & Kim, Adlar J. & Lo, Andrew W., 2010. "Consumer credit-risk models via machine-learning algorithms," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 34(11), pages 2767-2787, November.
    11. Julie Carlson & Leemore Dafny & Beth Freeborn & Pauline Ippolito & Brett Wendling, 2013. "Economics at the FTC: Physician Acquisitions, Standard Essential Patents, and Accuracy of Credit Reporting," Review of Industrial Organization, Springer, vol. 43(4), pages 303-326, December.

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