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Checking accounts: what do banks offer and what do consumers value?

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  • Joanna Stavins
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    Abstract

    Recent evidence shows that the supply of deposits to checking accounts is not elastic with respect to the interest rates paid. That suggests that various features attached to checking accounts may be important in determining the supply of deposits and banks' and revenues from the fees. This study uses a national survey of checking accounts offered by financial institutions in 25 major metropolitan areas in the United States to analyze the effects of restrictions and fees imposed on checking account holders on the supply of deposits and on the banks' check fee revenues. The author places particular emphasis on relatively new restrictions designed to induce customers to adopt cost-saving behavior, such as restrictions on the return of canceled checks and on the use of live tellers. She finds the supply of deposits into checking accounts to be responsive to the bank's per-item fees, check return restrictions, teller restrictions, and foreign ATM fees. Because of this sensitivity of deposit supply, raising most of those fees was found to lower bank revenues from servicing the checking accounts. Only the fee on check return and the NSF fee were found to significantly raise bank revenues.

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    Bibliographic Info

    Article provided by Federal Reserve Bank of Boston in its journal New England Economic Review.

    Volume (Year): (1999)
    Issue (Month): Mar ()
    Pages: 3-14

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    Handle: RePEc:fip:fedbne:y:1999:i:mar:p:3-14

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    Keywords: Checking accounts ; Checks ; Consumer behavior;

    References

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    Please report citation or reference errors to , or , if you are the registered author of the cited work, log in to your RePEc Author Service profile, click on "citations" and make appropriate adjustments.:
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    1. Kenneth C. Carraro & Daniel L. Thornton, 1986. "The cost of checkable deposits in the United States," Review, Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, issue Apr, pages 19-27.
    2. Joanna Stavins, 1997. "A comparison of social costs and benefits of paper check presentment and ECP with truncation," New England Economic Review, Federal Reserve Bank of Boston, issue Jul, pages 27-44.
    3. Garth Saloner & Andrea Shepard, 1995. "Adoption of Technologies with Network Effects: An Empirical Examination of the Adoption of Teller Machines," RAND Journal of Economics, The RAND Corporation, vol. 26(3), pages 479-501, Autumn.
    4. David B. Humphrey, 1994. "Delivering deposit services: ATMs versus branches," Economic Quarterly, Federal Reserve Bank of Richmond, issue Spr, pages 59-81.
    5. Arthur B. Kennickell & Martha Starr-McCluer & Annika E. Sunden, 1997. "Family finances in the U.S.: recent evidence from the Survey of Consumer Finances," Federal Reserve Bulletin, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.), issue Jan, pages 1-24.
    6. Amel, Dean F. & Hannan, Timothy H., 1999. "Establishing banking market definitions through estimation of residual deposit supply equations," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 23(11), pages 1667-1690, November.
    7. James J. McAndrews, 1991. "The evolution of shared ATM networks," Business Review, Federal Reserve Bank of Philadelphia, issue May, pages 3-16.
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    Cited by:
    1. Christopher R. Knittel & Victor Stango, 2004. "Compatibility and Pricing with Indirect Network Effects: Evidence from ATMs," NBER Working Papers 10774, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    2. Christopher R. Knittel & Victor Stango, 2004. "Incompatibility, Product Attributes and Consumer Welfare: Evidence from ATMs," Working Papers 04-06, NET Institute, revised Oct 2004.
    3. Brian Mantel, 2000. "Why do consumers pay bills electronically? an empirical analysis," Economic Perspectives, Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago, issue Q IV, pages 32-48.
    4. Brian Mantel, 2000. "Why don't consumers use electronic banking products? towards a theory of obstacles, incentives, and opportunities," Occasional Paper; Emerging Payments EPS-2000-1, Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago.
    5. Cara S. Lown & Stavros Peristiani & Kenneth J. Robinson, 1999. "What was behind the M2 breakdown?," Staff Reports 83, Federal Reserve Bank of New York.

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