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Access to railway stations and its potential in increasing rail use

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  • Brons, Martijn
  • Givoni, Moshe
  • Rietveld, Piet

Abstract

The propensity to travel by rail, and not, for example by car, can be considered to be a factor of the rail service offered, the access to it and the characteristics of the population served. Efforts to increase rail use usually focus on the rail service itself while the accessibility of the rail network receives less attention. In this context, the paper has two broad aims. First, to evaluate how important the 'access-to-the-station' part of a rail journey is to passengers in their overall satisfaction with the rail journey and second, to investigate the balance between characteristics of the service, the access to it and the population served in determining rail use in different parts of the rail network. The analysis is carried out for the Netherlands. To achieve the first aim, we use the Dutch Railways customer satisfaction survey and apply principal component analysis and derived importance techniques to assess the relative importance of accessibility in determining the overall satisfaction with the rail journey. For the second aim, we use regression analysis to explain, at the Dutch postcode level, the propensity to use rail. We find that satisfaction with the level and quality of the access to the station is an important dimension of the rail journey which influences the overall satisfaction from that journey and that the quality and level of accessibility is an important element in explaining rail use. The conclusion reached is that in many parts of the rail network improving and expanding access services to the railway station can substitute for improving and expanding the services provided on the rail network and that it is probably more cost efficient when the aim is to increase rail use. These parts of the network are mainly in the periphery where the current level of rail service is relatively low.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice.

Volume (Year): 43 (2009)
Issue (Month): 2 (February)
Pages: 136-149

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Handle: RePEc:eee:transa:v:43:y:2009:i:2:p:136-149

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Related research

Keywords: Railway station Station accessibility Rail Principal component analysis;

References

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  1. Hine, J. & Scott, J., 2000. "Seamless, accessible travel: users' views of the public transport journey and interchange," Transport Policy, Elsevier, vol. 7(3), pages 217-226, July.
  2. Mark Wardman & Jonathan Tyler, 2000. "Rail network accessibility and the demand for inter-urban rail travel," Transport Reviews, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 20(1), pages 3-24, January.
  3. Robert Cervero, 2007. "Transit-oriented development’s ridership bonus: a product of self-selection and public policies," Environment and Planning A, Pion Ltd, London, vol. 39(9), pages 2068-2085, September.
  4. Givoni, Moshe & Rietveld, Piet, 2007. "The access journey to the railway station and its role in passengers' satisfaction with rail travel," Transport Policy, Elsevier, vol. 14(5), pages 357-365, September.
  5. Krygsman, Stephan & Dijst, Martin & Arentze, Theo, 2004. "Multimodal public transport: an analysis of travel time elements and the interconnectivity ratio," Transport Policy, Elsevier, vol. 11(3), pages 265-275, July.
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Citations

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Cited by:
  1. Lindsey, Marshall & Schofer, Joseph L. & Durango-Cohen, Pablo & Gray, Kimberly A., 2010. "Relationship between proximity to transit and ridership for journey-to-work trips in Chicago," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 44(9), pages 697-709, November.
  2. Socorro, M. Pilar & Viecens, M. Fernanda, 2013. "The effects of airline and high speed train integration," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 49(C), pages 160-177.
  3. Cheng, Yung-Hsiang & Liu, Kuo-Chu, 2012. "Evaluating bicycle-transit users’ perceptions of intermodal inconvenience," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 46(10), pages 1690-1706.
  4. Hector G. LOPEZ-RUIZ & Panayotis CHRISTIDIS & Hande DEMIREL & Mert KOMPIL, 2013. "Quantifying the Effects of Sustainable Urban Mobility Plans," JRC-IPTS Working Papers JRC84116, Institute for Prospective and Technological Studies, Joint Research Centre.
  5. Fabling, Richard & Grimes, Arthur & Sanderson, Lynda, 2013. "Any port in a storm: Impacts of new port infrastructure on exporter behaviour," Transportation Research Part E: Logistics and Transportation Review, Elsevier, vol. 49(1), pages 33-47.
  6. Pucher, John & Buehler, Ralph & Seinen, Mark, 2011. "Bicycling renaissance in North America? An update and re-appraisal of cycling trends and policies," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 45(6), pages 451-475, July.
  7. Blainey, Simon P. & Preston, John M., 2013. "A GIS-based appraisal framework for new local railway stations and services," Transport Policy, Elsevier, vol. 25(C), pages 41-51.
  8. Richard Fabling & Arthur Grimes & Lynda Sanderson, 2011. "Any port in a storm? The impact of new port infrastructure on New Zealand exporter behaviour," Reserve Bank of New Zealand Discussion Paper Series DP2011/01, Reserve Bank of New Zealand.
  9. Ralph Buehler & John Pucher, 2012. "Cycling to work in 90 large American cities: new evidence on the role of bike paths and lanes," Transportation, Springer, vol. 39(2), pages 409-432, March.

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