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Socioeconomic status and health: The role of subjective social status

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  • Demakakos, Panayotes
  • Nazroo, James
  • Breeze, Elizabeth
  • Marmot, Michael
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    Abstract

    Studies have suggested that subjective social status (SSS) is an important predictor of health. This study examined the link between SSS and health in old age and investigated whether SSS mediated the associations between objective indicators of socioeconomic status and health. It used cross-sectional data from the second wave (2004-2005) of the English Longitudinal Study of Ageing, which were collected through personal interviews and nurse visits. The study population consisted of 3368 men and 4065 women aged 52 years or older. The outcome measures included: self-rated health, long-standing illness, depression, hypertension, diabetes, central obesity, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, triglycerides, fibrinogen, and C-reactive protein. The main independent variable was SSS measured using a scale representing a 10-rung ladder. Wealth, education, and occupational class were employed as covariates along with age and marital status and also, in additional analyses, as the main independent variables. Gender-specific logistic and linear regression analyses were performed. In age-adjusted analyses SSS was related positively to almost all health outcomes. Many of these relationships remained significant after adjustment for covariates. In men, SSS was significantly (pÂ

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    Bibliographic Info

    Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Social Science & Medicine.

    Volume (Year): 67 (2008)
    Issue (Month): 2 (July)
    Pages: 330-340

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    Handle: RePEc:eee:socmed:v:67:y:2008:i:2:p:330-340

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    Related research

    Keywords: Subjective social status Health inequalities Education Wealth UK Occupational class Old age;

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    Cited by:
    1. Adena, Maja & Myck, Michal, 2013. "Poverty and transitions in health," Discussion Papers, Research Unit: Economics of Change SP II 2013-307, Social Science Research Center Berlin (WZB).
    2. Elena Pirani & Silvana Salvini, 2012. "Socioeconomic Inequalities and Self-Rated Health: A Multilevel Study of Italian Elderly," Population Research and Policy Review, Springer, vol. 31(1), pages 97-117, February.
    3. Rosenfield, Sarah, 2012. "Triple jeopardy? Mental health at the intersection of gender, race, and class," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 74(11), pages 1791-1801.
    4. Alexander M. Danzer & Barbara Dietz & Kseniia Gatskova & Achim Schmillen, 2013. "Showing off to the new neighbors? Income, socioeconomic status and consumption patterns of internal migrants," Working Papers 330, Institut für Ost- und Südosteuropaforschung (Institute for East and South-East European Studies).
    5. Hendrik Jürges, 2009. "The effect of compulsory schooling on health - evidence from biomarkers," MEA discussion paper series 09183, Munich Center for the Economics of Aging (MEA) at the Max Planck Institute for Social Law and Social Policy.
    6. Nobles, Jenna & Weintraub, Miranda Ritterman & Adler, Nancy E., 2013. "Subjective socioeconomic status and health: Relationships reconsidered," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 82(C), pages 58-66.
    7. Stavros A. Drakopoulos, 2011. "Economic Policies, Political Considerations and Overall Health," Economic Analysis and Policy (EAP), Queensland University of Technology (QUT), School of Economics and Finance, vol. 41(3), pages 273-286, December.
    8. Hudson, Eibhlin, 2013. "Does relative material wealth matter for child and adolescent life satisfaction?," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 46(C), pages 38-47.
    9. Alexander Miething, 2013. "The Relevance of Objective and Subjective Social Position for Self-Rated Health: A Combined Approach for the Swedish Context," Social Indicators Research, Springer, vol. 111(1), pages 161-173, March.

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