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A typology of preferences for participation in healthcare decision making

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  • Flynn, Kathryn E.
  • Smith, Maureen A.
  • Vanness, David
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    Abstract

    Classifying patients as "active" or "passive" with regard to healthcare decision making is misleading, since patients have different desires for different components of the decision-making process. Distinguishing patients' desired roles is an essential step towards promoting care that respects and responds to individual patients' preferences. We included items on the 2004 Wisconsin Longitudinal Study mail survey measuring preferences for four components of the decision-making process: physician knowledge of patient medical history, physician disclosure of treatment choices, discussion of treatment choices, and selection of treatment choice. We characterized preference types for 5199 older adults using cluster analysis. Ninety-six percent of respondents are represented by four preference types, all of which prefer maximal information exchange with physicians. Fifty-seven percent of respondents wanted to retain personal control over important medical decisions ("autonomists"). Among the autonomists, 81% preferred to discuss treatment choices with their physician. Thirty-nine percent of respondents wanted their physician to make important medical decisions ("delegators"). Among the delegators, 41% preferred to discuss treatment choices. Female gender, higher educational attainment, better self-rated health, fewer prescription medications, and having a shorter duration at a usual place of care predicted a significantly higher probability of the most active involvement in discussing and selecting treatment choices. The overwhelming majority of older adults want to be given treatment options and have their physician know everything about their medical history; however, there are substantial differences in how they want to be involved in discussing and selecting treatments.

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    Bibliographic Info

    Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Social Science & Medicine.

    Volume (Year): 63 (2006)
    Issue (Month): 5 (September)
    Pages: 1158-1169

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    Handle: RePEc:eee:socmed:v:63:y:2006:i:5:p:1158-1169

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    Related research

    Keywords: US Decision making Patient preferences Communication Survey research Cluster analysis;

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    Cited by:
    1. Meinow, Bettina & Parker, Marti G. & Thorslund, Mats, 2011. "Consumers of eldercare in Sweden: The semblance of choice," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 73(9), pages 1285-1289.
    2. Semra Özdemir & Ateesha F. Mohamed & F. Reed Johnson & A. Brett Hauber, 2010. "Who pays attention in stated-choice surveys?," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 19(1), pages 111-118.

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