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Giving overseas and public policy

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  • Atkinson, A.B.

Abstract

Remarkable numbers of people give to overseas development charities. The aim of this paper is to consider how such overseas giving is best modelled and the implications for public policy. Widely used theories of charitable giving, based on warm-glow or the provision of public goods, provide insight but are not fully satisfactory as explanations of giving for the specific purpose of development. Instead, an "identification" approach to individual giving is proposed here that combines the results focus of the public goods formulation with the scale of the warm-glow model. The theoretical model is used to examine the implications for public policy, including the extent to which official aid crowds out private giving and how public policy should take account of private willingness to make charitable transfers overseas.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Journal of Public Economics.

Volume (Year): 93 (2009)
Issue (Month): 5-6 (June)
Pages: 647-653

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Handle: RePEc:eee:pubeco:v:93:y:2009:i:5-6:p:647-653

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Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/inca/505578

Related research

Keywords: Giving Development assistance Charities Social welfare;

References

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  1. Dasgupta, Indraneel & Kanbur, Ravi, 2007. "Should Egalitarians Expropriate Philanthropists?," CEPR Discussion Papers 6362, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  2. Kenneth E. Boulding, 1962. "Notes on a Theory of Philanthropy," NBER Chapters, in: Philanthropy and Public Policy, pages 57-72 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  3. Cornes, Richard & Sandler, Todd, 1984. "Easy Riders, Joint Production, and Public Goods," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 94(375), pages 580-98, September.
  4. Micklewright, John & Schnepf, Sylke V., 2007. "Who Gives for Overseas Development?," IZA Discussion Papers 3057, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  5. Duncan, Brian, 2004. "A theory of impact philanthropy," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 88(9-10), pages 2159-2180, August.
  6. Cornes, Richard & Sandler, Todd, 1984. "The theory of public goods: non-nash behaviour," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 23(3), pages 367-379, April.
  7. Sugden, Robert, 1982. "On the Economics of Philanthropy," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 92(366), pages 341-50, June.
  8. Todd Sandler & Daniel G. Arce, 2007. "New face of development assistance: public goods and changing ethics," Journal of International Development, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 19(4), pages 527-544.
  9. William Vickrey, 1962. "One Economist's View of Philanthropy," NBER Chapters, in: Philanthropy and Public Policy, pages 31-56 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  10. Diamond, Peter, 2006. "Optimal tax treatment of private contributions for public goods with and without warm glow preferences," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 90(4-5), pages 897-919, May.
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Citations

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Cited by:
  1. David Reinstein & Gerhard Riener, 2010. "Reputation and Influence in Charitable Giving: An Experiment," Economics Discussion Papers 688, University of Essex, Department of Economics.
  2. David Reinstein, 2014. "The Economics of the Gift," Economics Discussion Papers 749, University of Essex, Department of Economics.
  3. Abbott, Andrew & Nandeibam, Shasikanta & O'Shea, Lucy, 2013. "Recycling: Social norms and warm-glow revisited," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 90(C), pages 10-18.
  4. Alan Krause, . "Taxing and Subsidising Charitable Contributions," Discussion Papers 09/23, Department of Economics, University of York.

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