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Peer-to-peer and mass communication effect on opinion shifts

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  • Kindler, A.
  • Solomon, S.
  • Stauffer, D.
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    Abstract

    Opinion dynamics is studied through a minimal Ising model with three main influences (fields): personal conservatism (power-law distributed), inter-personal and group pressure, and a global field incorporating peer-to-peer and mass communications, which is generated bottom-up from the faction supporting the new opinion. A rich phase diagram appears separating possible terminal stages of the opinion diffusion, characterizing failure phases by the features of the individuals who had changed their opinion. An exhaustive solution of the model is produced, allowing predictions to be made on the opinion’s assimilation in the society.

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    File URL: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0378437112009399
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    Bibliographic Info

    Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Physica A: Statistical Mechanics and its Applications.

    Volume (Year): 392 (2013)
    Issue (Month): 4 ()
    Pages: 785-796

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    Handle: RePEc:eee:phsmap:v:392:y:2013:i:4:p:785-796

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    Web page: http://www.journals.elsevier.com/physica-a-statistical-mechpplications/

    Related research

    Keywords: Revolution; Opinion dynamics; Percolation; Ising model; Phase transition;

    References

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    1. Mirta B. Gordon & Jean-Pierre Nadal & Denis Phan & Viktoriya Semeshenko, 2007. "Discrete Choices under Social Influence: Generic Properties," Working Papers halshs-00135405, HAL.
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    7. Masaki Tomochi & Hiroaki Murata & Mitsuo Kono, 2005. "A consumer-based model of competitive diffusion: the multiplicative effects of global and local network externalities," Journal of Evolutionary Economics, Springer, vol. 15(3), pages 273-295, 08.
    8. Le Breton, Michel & Weber, Shlomo, 2011. "Games of social interactions with local and global externalities," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 111(1), pages 88-90, April.
    9. Jean-Michel Dalle, 1997. "Heterogeneity vs. externalities in technological competition: A tale of possible technological landscapes," Journal of Evolutionary Economics, Springer, vol. 7(4), pages 395-413.
    10. Sebastian Goncalves & M. F. Laguna & J. R. Iglesias, 2012. "Why, when, and how fast innovations are adopted," Papers 1208.2589, arXiv.org.
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