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Models in evolutionary economics and environmental policy: Towards an evolutionary environmental economics

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  • Albert Faber

    ()

  • Koen Frenken

    ()

Abstract

In this paper we review evolutionary economic modelling in relation to environmental policy. We discuss three areas in which evolutionary economic models have a particularly high added value for environmental policy-making: the double externality problem, technological transitions and consumer demand. We explore the possibilities to apply evolutionary economic models in environmental policy assessment, including the opportunities for making policy-making endogenous to environmental innovation. We end with a critical discussion of the challenges that remain.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Utrecht University, Department of Innovation Studies in its series Innovation Studies Utrecht (ISU) working paper series with number 08-15.

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Date of creation: Apr 2008
Date of revision: Apr 2008
Handle: RePEc:uis:wpaper:0815

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Web page: http://www.uu.nl/faculty/geosciences/EN/research/institutesandgroups/researchinstitutes/copernicusinstitute/research/Innovation/Pages/default.aspx

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Citations

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Cited by:
  1. Walz, Rainer & Helfrich, Nicki & Enzmann, Alexander, 2009. "A system dynamics approach for modelling a lead-market-based export potential," Working Papers "Sustainability and Innovation" S3/2009, Fraunhofer Institute for Systems and Innovation Research (ISI).
  2. Nathalie Lazaric & Kevin Maréchal, 2010. "Overcoming inertia: insights from evolutionary economics into improved energy and climate policy," Post-Print hal-00452205, HAL.
  3. Pedro, de Mendonça, 2009. "Self-Enforcing Climate Change Treaties: A Generalized Differential Game Approach with Applications," MPRA Paper 17889, University Library of Munich, Germany.

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