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Defensive reactions to slim female images in advertising: The moderating role of mode of exposure

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  • Wan, Fang
  • Ansons, Tamara L.
  • Chattopadhyay, Amitava
  • Leboe, Jason P.
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    Abstract

    Across three studies, we examined the impact of exposure to idealized female images, blatantly vs. subtly, on females’ self-evaluations, as well as attitude towards brands endorsed by the models with these idealized body images, in marketing communications. We theorized and showed that blatant exposure can elicit defensive coping, leading to a more positive self-evaluation and a lower brand attitude toward a brand endorsed by a model with an idealized body image. When exposure is subtle, however, idealized body images lead to lowered self-evaluations and increased evaluations of endorsed brands.

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    File URL: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0749597812000970
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    Bibliographic Info

    Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes.

    Volume (Year): 120 (2013)
    Issue (Month): 1 ()
    Pages: 37-46

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    Handle: RePEc:eee:jobhdp:v:120:y:2013:i:1:p:37-46

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    Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/obhdp

    Related research

    Keywords: Self-evaluation; Denigration; Product evaluation; Defense mechanism; Cognitive resources; Semantic priming; Mode of exposure; Idealized images;

    References

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    1. Bargh, John A, 2002. " Losing Consciousness: Automatic Influences on Consumer Judgment, Behavior, and Motivation," Journal of Consumer Research, University of Chicago Press, vol. 29(2), pages 280-85, September.
    2. Kahle, Lynn R & Homer, Pamela M, 1985. " Physical Attractiveness of the Celebrity Endorser: A Social Adaptation Perspective," Journal of Consumer Research, University of Chicago Press, vol. 11(4), pages 954-61, March.
    3. Dirk Smeesters & Naomi Mandel, 2006. "Positive and Negative Media Image Effects on the Self," Journal of Consumer Research, University of Chicago Press, vol. 32(4), pages 576-582, 03.
    4. Richins, Marsha L, 1991. " Social Comparison and the Idealized Images of Advertising," Journal of Consumer Research, University of Chicago Press, vol. 18(1), pages 71-83, June.
    5. Dirk Smeesters & Thomas Mussweiler & Naomi Mandel, 2010. "The Effects of Thin and Heavy Media Images on Overweight and Underweight Consumers: Social Comparison Processes and Behavioral Implications," Journal of Consumer Research, University of Chicago Press, vol. 36(6), pages 930-949, 04.
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