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Nesting local forestry initiatives: Revisiting community forest management in a REDD+ world

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  • Hayes, Tanya
  • Persha, Lauren
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    Abstract

    Understanding the relationship between components of varied decentralized governance models for community or collaborative management and forest conservation outcomes has taken on renewed importance in the context of community engagement in forest conservation efforts through policies to reduce emissions from deforestation and forest degradation (REDD+). In this paper, we synthesize lessons from two comparative case studies of decentralized forest management in Mesoamerica and East Africa in order to examine the institutional factors that contribute to successful tropical forest management in developing countries and, draw insights for policymakers regarding how national policy initiatives, including REDD+, might better embed local level institutions for forest management within broader state institutions and promote more positive local livelihoods and forest conservation outcomes. The case studies presented in this synthesis used a consistent research framework to gather data on forestry reforms, governance processes, local forest institutions, household forest uses and forest conservation outcomes. Our synthesis suggests that successful sustained forest management depends on institutional arrangements that (1) establish local resident rulemaking autonomy, (2) facilitate the flow of external financial and institutional assistance for monitoring and enforcement of local rules, and (3) buffer residents and their respective local institutions from more powerful, and at times corrupt, actors and agencies involved in forest exploitation. The results particularly suggest a role for external, independent non-governmental organizations to help mediate demands on local forest governance systems in nested contexts.

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    Bibliographic Info

    Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Forest Policy and Economics.

    Volume (Year): 12 (2010)
    Issue (Month): 8 (October)
    Pages: 545-553

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    Handle: RePEc:eee:forpol:v:12:y:2010:i:8:p:545-553

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    Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/forpol

    Related research

    Keywords: Decentralization Forest conservation Joint forest management Institutional analysis Tanzania Central America;

    References

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    1. Edella Schlager & Elinor Ostrom, 1992. "Property-Rights Regimes and Natural Resources: A Conceptual Analysis," Land Economics, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 68(3), pages 249-262.
    2. Sunderlin, William D. & Angelsen, Arild & Belcher, Brian & Burgers, Paul & Nasi, Robert & Santoso, Levania & Wunder, Sven, 2005. "Livelihoods, forests, and conservation in developing countries: An Overview," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 33(9), pages 1383-1402, September.
    3. Ribot, Jesse C. & Agrawal, Arun & Larson, Anne M., 2006. "Recentralizing While Decentralizing: How National Governments Reappropriate Forest Resources," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 34(11), pages 1864-1886, November.
    4. Agrawal, Arun, 2001. "Common Property Institutions and Sustainable Governance of Resources," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 29(10), pages 1649-1672, October.
    5. Gibson, Clark C. & Williams, John T. & Ostrom, Elinor, 2005. "Local Enforcement and Better Forests," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 33(2), pages 273-284, February.
    6. Sikor, Thomas & Nguyen, Tan Quang, 2007. "Why May Forest Devolution Not Benefit the Rural Poor? Forest Entitlements in Vietnam's Central Highlands," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 35(11), pages 2010-2025, November.
    7. Hayes, Tanya M., 2006. "Parks, People, and Forest Protection: An Institutional Assessment of the Effectiveness of Protected Areas," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 34(12), pages 2064-2075, December.
    8. Nygren, Anja, 2005. "Community-based forest management within the context of institutional decentralization in Honduras," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 33(4), pages 639-655, April.
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    Cited by:
    1. Mucahid Mustafa Bayrak & Tran Nam Tu & Lawal Mohammed Marafa, 2014. "Creating Social Safeguards for REDD+: Lessons Learned from Benefit Sharing Mechanisms in Vietnam," Land, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 3(3), pages 1037-1058, August.

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