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Ecological economics at a crossroads

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  • Gowdy, John
  • Erickson, Jon

Abstract

During the past decade theoretical and empirical advances in neoclassical economics have resulted in the virtual rejection of the two pillars of traditional welfare economics-- rational economic man and perfect competition. Surprisingly, many ecological economists are moving closer to the discredited neo-Walrasian welfare model just at the time it is being replaced within the mainstream. We call for a return to the roots of ecological economics and an engagement with current developments in mainstream theory.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Ecological Economics.

Volume (Year): 53 (2005)
Issue (Month): 1 (April)
Pages: 17-20

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Handle: RePEc:eee:ecolec:v:53:y:2005:i:1:p:17-20

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Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/ecolecon

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References

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  1. Gintis, Herbert, 2000. "Beyond Homo economicus: evidence from experimental economics," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 35(3), pages 311-322, December.
  2. John M. Gowdy, 2003. "The Revolution in Welfare Economics and its Implications for Environmental Valuation and Policy," Rensselaer Working Papers in Economics 0315, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Department of Economics.
  3. Daniel Kahneman, 2003. "Maps of Bounded Rationality: Psychology for Behavioral Economics," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 93(5), pages 1449-1475, December.
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Citations

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Cited by:
  1. Clive L. Spash, 2013. "The Shallow or the Deep Ecological Economics Movement?," SRE-Disc sre-disc-2013_01, Institute for the Environment and Regional Development, Department of Socioeconomics, Vienna University of Economics and Business.
  2. Funk, Matt, 2008. "On the Problem of Sustainable Economic Development: A Theoretical Solution to this Prisoner's Dilemma," MPRA Paper 19025, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised 08 Jun 2008.
  3. Jiřina Jílková & Lenka Slavíková, 2009. "Economics of the Environmental Protection on the Crossroad," Politická ekonomie, University of Economics, Prague, vol. 2009(5), pages 660-676.
  4. Marechal, Kevin, 2007. "The economics of climate change and the change of climate in economics," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 35(10), pages 5181-5194, October.
  5. Fisher, Brendan & Turner, R. Kerry & Morling, Paul, 2009. "Defining and classifying ecosystem services for decision making," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 68(3), pages 643-653, January.
  6. Alexander Harin, 2005. "A Rational Irrational Man," Public Economics 0511005, EconWPA.
  7. Alexander Harin, 2006. "A Rational Irrational Man?," Microeconomics harin_alexander.34115-060, Socionet.
  8. Kevin Maréchal & Hélène Aubaret-Joachain & Jean-Paul Ledant, 2008. "The influence of Economics on agricultural systems: an evolutionary and ecological perspective," Working Papers CEB 08-028.RS, ULB -- Universite Libre de Bruxelles.
  9. Venkatachalam, L., 2007. "Environmental economics and ecological economics: Where they can converge?," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 61(2-3), pages 550-558, March.
  10. Andrew Balmford & Brendan Fisher & Rhys Green & Robin Naidoo & Bernardo Strassburg & R. Kerry Turner & Ana Rodrigues, 2011. "Bringing Ecosystem Services into the Real World: An Operational Framework for Assessing the Economic Consequences of Losing Wild Nature," Environmental & Resource Economics, European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 48(2), pages 161-175, February.
  11. Benjamin Leard, 2011. "Joan Martinez-Alier and Ingo Ropke (eds.): Recent developments in ecological economics (2 vols.)," Journal of Bioeconomics, Springer, vol. 13(2), pages 161-178, July.

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