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A Longitudinal Analysis of Infant and Child Mortality Rates in Developing Countries

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  • Alok Bhargava

    (University of Houston)

  • Jiang Yu

    (University of Houston)

Abstract

Child mortality is an important indicator of economic and social development in developing countries. This paper investigates the determinant of infant and child mortality rates in 13 African and 23 non-African developing countries using data based on demographic surveys. A longitudinal analysis incorporating temporal dependence in the data and cross-country heterogeneity is performed at the country level for the period 1975-85. The main findings are that elasticities of child mortality rates with respect to female illiteracy are close to unity in African countries but are lower for non-African countries. Also, real per capita Gross National Product and government expenditures on health are inversely associated with mortality rates in African countries. Some aspects of specifying models for child mortality and their implications are discussed.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Department of Economics, Delhi School of Economics in its journal Indian Economic Review.

Volume (Year): 32 (1997)
Issue (Month): 2 (July)
Pages: 141-153

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Handle: RePEc:dse:indecr:v:32:y:1997:i:2:p:141-153

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Cited by:
  1. Bidani, Benu & Ravallion, Martin, 1997. "Decomposing social indicators using distributional data," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 77(1), pages 125-139, March.
  2. Melanie Fox-Kean & Alok Bhargava, 2004. "The effects of meternal education versus cognitive test scores on child nutrition in Kenya," Econometric Society 2004 North American Winter Meetings 39, Econometric Society.
  3. Eric Neumayer & Matthew A. Cole, 2003. "The Impact of Poor Health on Total Factor Productivity," HEW 0312001, EconWPA, revised 02 Nov 2004.
  4. Simone Borghesi & Alessandro Vercelli, 2003. "Globalisation, Inequality and Health," Department of Economics University of Siena 413, Department of Economics, University of Siena.
  5. Borghesi, Simone & Vercelli, Alessandro, 2005. "Global Health," AICCON Working Papers 13-2005, Associazione Italiana per la Cultura della Cooperazione e del Non Profit.
  6. Bhargava, Alok & Docquier, Frédéric & Moullan, Yasser, 2011. "Modeling the effects of physician emigration on human development," Economics & Human Biology, Elsevier, vol. 9(2), pages 172-183, March.

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