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Globalisation, Inequality and Health

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  • Simone Borghesi

    ()

  • Alessandro Vercelli

    ()

Abstract

As we suggested in a previous work (Borghesi and Vercelli, Sustainable globalisation, Ecological Economics, vol.44, n.1, 2003), the process of globalisation affects the sustainability of development mainly through three channels: economic growth, inequality and environmental degradation. This conceptual framework may help us to understand also the causal influence of globalisation on health that represents a fundamental dimension of the quality of life enjoyed by the people and of sustainability. For this purpose, the present paper aims to investigate both the direct and the indirect effects of post-war globalisation, with particular attention to the role played by inequality in the globalisation-health relationship. A few policy implications emerging from the analysis are also discussed, suggesting a policy strategy that can at the same time improve health and make the current globalisation process more compatible with sustainable development.

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Paper provided by Department of Economics, University of Siena in its series Department of Economics University of Siena with number 413.

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Date of creation: Nov 2003
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Handle: RePEc:usi:wpaper:413

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Keywords: globalisation; inequality; health; sustainable development;

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  1. Samuel Bowles & Herbert Gintis, 2002. "The Inheritance of Inequality," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 16(3), pages 3-30, Summer.
  2. Angus Deaton, 2002. "Health, inequality, and economic development," Working Papers 270, Princeton University, Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs, Center for Health and Wellbeing..
  3. Robert Beaglehole & Anthony McMichael, 1999. "The Future of Public Health in a Changing Global Context," Development, Palgrave Macmillan, vol. 42(4), pages 12-16, December.
  4. Bhargava, Alok & Jamison, Dean T. & Lau, Lawrence J. & Murray, Christopher J. L., 2001. "Modeling the effects of health on economic growth," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 20(3), pages 423-440, May.
  5. Todd Sandler & Daniel G Arce M, 2002. "A conceptual framework for understanding global and transnational public goods for health," Fiscal Studies, Institute for Fiscal Studies, vol. 23(2), pages 195-222, June.
  6. Borghesi, Simone & Vercelli, Alessandro, 2003. "Sustainable globalisation," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 44(1), pages 77-89, February.
  7. Peter H. Lindert & Jeffrey G. Williamson, 2003. "Does Globalization Make the World More Unequal?," NBER Chapters, in: Globalization in Historical Perspective, pages 227-276 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  8. David E. Bloom & Jeffrey D. Sachs, 1998. "Geography, Demography, and Economic Growth in Africa," Brookings Papers on Economic Activity, Economic Studies Program, The Brookings Institution, vol. 29(2), pages 207-296.
  9. Alok Bhargava & Jiang Yu, 1997. "A Longitudinal Analysis of Infant and Child Mortality Rates in Developing Countries," Indian Economic Review, Department of Economics, Delhi School of Economics, vol. 32(2), pages 141-153, July.
  10. Samuel H. Preston & Michael R. Haines, 1991. "Fatal Years: Child Mortality in Late Nineteenth-Century America," NBER Books, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc, number pres91-1, July.
  11. Jeffrey D. Sachs, 2001. "Tropical Underdevelopment," NBER Working Papers 8119, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  12. Scott Barrett, 2003. "Global Disease Eradication," Journal of the European Economic Association, MIT Press, vol. 1(2-3), pages 591-600, 04/05.
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Cited by:
  1. Ceddia, M.G. & Bardsley, N.O. & Goodwin, R. & Holloway, G.J. & Nocella, G. & Stasi, A., 2013. "A complex system perspective on the emergence and spread of infectious diseases: Integrating economic and ecological aspects," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 90(C), pages 124-131.

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