Advanced Search
MyIDEAS: Login

Can Economic Activities Lead to Climate Chaos? An Economic Analysis on Global Warming

Contents:

Author Info

  • Zhiqi Chen

Abstract

This paper presents a two-sector dynamic general equilibrium model in which the productivity of the agricultural sector depends on the atmospheric temperature, which in turn is influenced by the activities of the manufacturing sector. The equilibrium time paths of the world economy and temperature depend on the rate at which the Earth sheds heat. If this decay is too small, the dynamic interaction between the climate system and the market mechanism, both of which are stable in isolation, may lead to cycles or even chaos. Furthermore, economic growth may push the world economy and temperature from a stable stead state into a cyclical or chaotic time path.

Download Info

If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.
File URL: http://links.jstor.org/sici?sici=0008-4085%28199705%2930%3A2%3C349%3ACEALTC%3E2.0.CO%3B2-Y
Download Restriction: only available to JSTOR subscribers

As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to look for a different version under "Related research" (further below) or search for a different version of it.

Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Canadian Economics Association in its journal Canadian Journal of Economics.

Volume (Year): 30 (1997)
Issue (Month): 2 (May)
Pages: 349-66

as in new window
Handle: RePEc:cje:issued:v:30:y:1997:i:2:p:349-66

Contact details of provider:
Postal: Canadian Economics Association Prof. Steven Ambler, Secretary-Treasurer c/o Olivier Lebert, CEA/CJE/CPP Office C.P. 35006, 1221 Fleury Est Montréal, Québec, Canada H2C 3K4
Email:
Web page: http://economics.ca/cje/
More information through EDIRC

Order Information:
Email:
Web: http://economics.ca/en/membership.php

Related research

Keywords:

References

No references listed on IDEAS
You can help add them by filling out this form.

Citations

Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
as in new window

Cited by:
  1. David Appels, 2001. "Forest rotation lengths under carbon sequestration payments," Others 0110007, EconWPA.
  2. Rosser Jr., J. Barkley, 2010. "Is a transdisciplinary perspective on economic complexity possible?," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 75(1), pages 3-11, July.
  3. Dutta, Prajit K. & Radner, Roy, 2009. "A strategic analysis of global warming: Theory and some numbers," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 71(2), pages 187-209, August.
  4. Barkley Rosser, J. Jr., 2001. "Complex ecologic-economic dynamics and environmental policy," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 37(1), pages 23-37, April.
  5. Cai, Yuezhou & Riezman, Raymond & Whalley, John, 2013. "International trade and the negotiability of global climate change agreements," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 33(C), pages 421-427.
  6. Antoci, Angelo & Borghesi, Simone & Russu, Paolo, 2004. "Biodiversity and economic growth: stabilization versus preservation of the ecological dynamics," MPRA Paper 13666, University Library of Munich, Germany.

Lists

This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

Statistics

Access and download statistics

Corrections

When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:cje:issued:v:30:y:1997:i:2:p:349-66. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Prof. Werner Antweiler).

If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.