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Computer Skills and Wages

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  • Miller, Paul
  • Mulvey, Charles

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Wiley Blackwell in its journal Australian Economic Papers.

Volume (Year): 36 (1997)
Issue (Month): 68 (June)
Pages: 106-13

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Handle: RePEc:bla:ausecp:v:36:y:1997:i:68:p:106-13

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Web page: http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/journal.asp?ref=0004-900X

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Cited by:
  1. Chiswick, Barry R. & Miller, Paul W., 2005. "Computer Skills, Destination Language Proficiency and the Earnings of Natives and Immigrants," IZA Discussion Papers 1755, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  2. Barry Chiswick & Paul Miller, 2007. "Computer usage, destination language proficiency and the earnings of natives and immigrants," Review of Economics of the Household, Springer, vol. 5(2), pages 129-157, June.
  3. Borghans L. & Weel B. ter, 2000. "How computerizaton changes the UK Labour Market: The Facts viewed from a new Perspective," ROA Working Paper 010, Maastricht University, Research Centre for Education and the Labour Market (ROA).
  4. Ng, Ying Chu, 2006. "Levels of computer self-efficacy, computer use and earnings in China," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 90(3), pages 427-432, March.
  5. Borghans,Lex & Weel,Bas,ter, 2001. "What happens when agent T gets a computer?," Research Memorandum 017, Maastricht University, Maastricht Economic Research Institute on Innovation and Technology (MERIT).
  6. Oosterbeek, Hessel & Ponce, Juan, 2011. "The impact of computer use on earnings in a developing country: Evidence from Ecuador," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 18(4), pages 434-440, August.
  7. G. Reza Arabsheibani & Alan Marin, 2006. "If not computers then what? Returns to computer use in the UK revisited," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 38(21), pages 2461-2467.
  8. Silke Anger & Johannes Schwarze, 2003. "Does Future PC Use Determine Our Wages Today? - Evidence from German Panel Data," LABOUR, CEIS, vol. 17(3), pages 337-360, 09.
  9. Jeff Borland & Joseph Hirschberg & Jenny Lye, 2004. "Computer knowledge and earnings: evidence for Australia," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 36(17), pages 1979-1993.

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