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Logistic modelling of smallholder livestock farmers’ adoption of tree-based fodder technology in Zimbabwe

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Author Info

  • Jera, R.
  • Ajayi, Olu Clifford

Abstract

Based on field data collected from 131 small scale dairy farmers that were randomly selected from four agro-ecological zones, this study assessed the potential of adoption of fodder bank technology as a means for improving livestock production and income generation for smallholder farmers in Zimbabwe. Using a logit modelling approach, it also identified the drivers of adoption of the technology by analysing the influence of household characteristics and ecological factors on farmers’ decision to adopt the technology. The model correctly predicted 75% of observed adoption and non-adoption by farmers. Results reveal that dairy herd size, land holding size, membership of dairy association and agro-ecological potential are the key factors influencing farmers’ adoption of fodder bank. Age, sex, household size and educational level of farmers play lesser role. Male and female farmers were equally likely to take up and practice fodder bank if they are given equal access to information and incentives. The study recommends farmer-led extension approaches where farmers who possess certain key characteristics should constitute the initial group for disseminating information regarding the technology in rural communities. The results highlight the importance of access to dairy product markets as a driver for the adoption of fodder banks. It is recommended that forging a strategic partnership with the Dairy Development Programme (DDP) will offer high potential for enhancing the scaling up of the adoption and impact of fodder bank technology in the country.

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File URL: http://purl.umn.edu/44033
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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Agricultural Economics Association of South Africa (AEASA) in its journal Agrekon.

Volume (Year): 47 (2008)
Issue (Month): 3 (September)
Pages:

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Handle: RePEc:ags:agreko:44033

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Web page: http://www.aeasa.org.za/
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Related research

Keywords: Livestock Production/Industries; Research and Development/Tech Change/Emerging Technologies;

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Cited by:
  1. Ayuya, Oscar Ingasia, 2010. "Evaluation Of Willingness To Accept And Adopt Clean Development Mechanism Projects Among Smallscale Farmers In Njoro District, Kenya," Research Theses 117799, Collaborative Masters Program in Agricultural and Applied Economics.
  2. Kinuthia, Emmanuel K., 2010. "The Effects Of The International Smallgroup And Tree Planting Program On Household Income In Nyeri District, Kenya," Research Theses 117709, Collaborative Masters Program in Agricultural and Applied Economics.

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