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Farmers’ health and agricultural productivity in rural Ethiopia

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Author Info

  • Ulimwengu, John M.

Abstract

This paper estimates a stochastic production using household survey data to analyze the relationship between farmers’ health impediments and agricultural production efficiency in Ethiopia. The results show that healthy farmers produce more per unit of inputs, earn more income and supply more labor than farmers affected by sickness. The model results show that production inefficiency increases significantly with the number of days lost to sickness. This finding suggests that investing in the health sector in rural areas will not only improve farmers’ agricultural performance but also increase their income. Policymakers should therefore devise strategies that will maximize the contribution of health investments to agricultural productivity and the overall rural economy.

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File URL: http://purl.umn.edu/56902
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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by African Association of Agricultural Economists in its journal African Journal of Agricultural and Resource Economics.

Volume (Year): 03 (2009)
Issue (Month): 2 (September)
Pages:

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Handle: RePEc:ags:afjare:56902

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Related research

Keywords: health; productivity; stochastic frontier; efficiency; Ethiopia; Health Economics and Policy; Productivity Analysis;

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Cited by:
  1. McNamara, Paul E. & Ulimwengu, John M. & Leonard, Kenneth L., 2010. "Do health investments improve agricultural productivity?," IFPRI discussion papers 1012, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
  2. Ulimwengu, John & Liverpool-Tasie, Saweda & Randriamamonjy, Josee & Ramadan, Racha, 2011. "Understanding the linkage between agricultural productivity and nutrient consumption: Evidence from Uganda," IFPRI discussion papers 1128, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
  3. Klasen, Stephan & Reimers, Malte, 2013. "Looking at Pro-Poor Growth from an Agricultural Perspective," 2013 Annual Meeting, August 4-6, 2013, Washington, D.C. 149745, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.
  4. Allen, Summer L. & Qaim, Matin, 2012. "Agricultural productivity and public expenditures in sub-saharan africa:," IFPRI discussion papers 1173, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
  5. Yin-Chi Wang, 2011. "Health, Education and Development," 2011 Meeting Papers 1263, Society for Economic Dynamics.

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