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The Yuan's Exchange Rates and Pass-through Effects on the Prices of Japanese and US Imports

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  • Xing, Yuqing

    (Asian Development Bank Institute)

Abstract

This paper estimated the pass-though effects of yuan's exchange rates on prices of the US and Japanese imports from the People's Republic of China (PRC). Empirical results show that, a 1% nominal appreciation of the yuan would result in a 0.23% increase in prices of the US imports in the short run and 0.47% in the long run. Japanese import prices were relatively more responsive to changes of the bilateral exchange rates between the yuan and the yen. For a 1% nominal appreciation of the yuan against the yen, Japanese import prices would be expected to rise 0.55% in the short run and 0.99%, a complete pass-through, in the long run. The high degree of pass-through effects were also found at the disaggregated sectoral level: food, raw materials, apparel, manufacturing, and machinery. However, further analysis indicated that the high pass-through effects in the case of Japan were mainly attributed to the PRC's policy to peg the yuan to the United States (US) dollar, and that the dollar is used as a dominant invoicing currency for the PRC's exports to Japan. After controlling the currency invoicing factor, I found no evidence that the yuan's cumulative appreciation since July 2005 was passed on to prices of Japanese imports at either the aggregate or disaggregated levels. The estimated low pass-through effects of the yuan's appreciation suggest that a moderate appreciation of the yuan would have very little impact on the PRC's trade surplus.

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File URL: http://www.adbi.org/working-paper/2010/05/18/3823.yuan.rates.effects.japanese.us.imports/
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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Asian Development Bank Institute in its series ADBI Working Papers with number 216.

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Length: 18 pages
Date of creation: 18 May 2010
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:ris:adbiwp:0216

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Keywords: exchange rate pass-through; prc; japan; usa;

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References

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  1. Willem Thorbecke & Gordon Smith, 2010. "How Would an Appreciation of the Renminbi and Other East Asian Currencies Affect China's Exports?," Review of International Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 18(1), pages 95-108, 02.
  2. Jiawen Yang, 1992. "Exchange Rate Pass-Through in U.S. Manufacturing Industries," Working Papers 92-28, New York University, Leonard N. Stern School of Business, Department of Economics.
  3. Robert J. Vigfusson & Nathan Sheets & Joseph Gagnon, 2007. "Exchange rate pass-through to export prices: assessing some cross-country evidence," International Finance Discussion Papers 902, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.).
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