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Dynamic Model of Peak Period Traffic Congestion with Elastic Arrival Rates

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  • Moshe Ben-Akiva
  • Andre de Palma
  • Pavlos Kanaroglou

Abstract

This paper develops a dynamic model of peak period traffic congestion that considers a limited number of bottlenecks. The model predicts the temporal distribution of traffic volumes with an elastic demand model. The choice of route and mode are dependent on travel times and costs. The choice of departure time is based on the tradeoff between travel time and schedule delay. Delays at bottlenecks are modelled with a deterministic queueing model that determines waiting times. This model is used to perform simulation experiments to analyze the impacts of alternative pricing policies and preferential treatment of High Occupancy Vehicles.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Queen's University, Department of Economics in its series Working Papers with number 588.

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Length: 39 pages
Date of creation: 1984
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:qed:wpaper:588

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Web page: http://qed.econ.queensu.ca/
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Cited by:
  1. William Lam & Hai-jun Huang, 2002. "A combined activity/travel choice model for congested road networks with queues," Transportation, Springer, vol. 29(1), pages 5-29, February.
  2. Kene Boun My & Laurent Denant-Boèmont & Frédéric Koessler & Marc Willinger & Anthony Ziegelmeyer, 2006. "Road Traffic Congestion and Public Information: An Experimental Investigation," Papers on Strategic Interaction 2006-20, Max Planck Institute of Economics, Strategic Interaction Group.
  3. Erik Teodoor Verhoef, 1998. "Time, speeds, flows and densities in static models of road traffic congestion and congestion pricing," ERSA conference papers ersa98p156, European Regional Science Association.
  4. David Levinson & Ajay Kumar, 1995. "Activity, Travel, and the Allocation of Time," Working Papers 199505, University of Minnesota: Nexus Research Group.
  5. Donald K. Richter & John Griffin & Richard Arnott, 1990. "Computation of Dynamic User Equilibria in a Model of Peak Period Traffic Congestion with Heterogenous Commuters," Boston College Working Papers in Economics 198, Boston College Department of Economics.
  6. Richard Arnott, 1989. "Does Providing Information to Drivers Reduce Traffic Congestion?," Discussion Papers 864, Northwestern University, Center for Mathematical Studies in Economics and Management Science.
  7. Richard Arnott, 1992. "Information and Usage of Congestible Facilities Under Free Access," Discussion Papers 974, Northwestern University, Center for Mathematical Studies in Economics and Management Science.

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