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Impacts of the Point System and Immigration Policy Levers on Skill Characteristics of Canadian Immigrants

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Author Info

  • Charles Beach

    ()
    (Queen's University)

  • Alan G. Green

    ()
    (Queen's University)

  • Christopher Worswick

    (Carleton University)

Abstract

This paper examines how changes in immigration policy levers actually affect the skill characteristics of immigrant arrivals using a unique Canadian immigrant landings database. We first review the Canadian experience with a point system as part of its immigrant policy. Section III of the paper describes some overall patterns of immigrant arrivals since 1980. Section IV identifies some relevant hypotheses on the possible effects on immigrant skill characteristics of the total immigration rate, the point system weights and immigrant class weights. The "skill" admissions examined are level of education, age, and fluency in either English or French. Regressions are then used to test the hypotheses from Canadian landings data. It is found that (i) the larger the inflow rate of immigrants the lower the average skill level of the arrivals; (ii) increasing the proportion of skill-evaluated immigrants raises average skill levels; (iii) increasing point system weights on a specific skill dimension indeed has the intended effect of raising average skill levels in this dimension among arriving principal applicants; and (iv) increasing the proportion of skill-evaluated immigrants appears to have the strongest effects among the immigration policy levers.

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File URL: http://qed.econ.queensu.ca/working_papers/papers/qed_wp_1115.pdf
File Function: First version 2006
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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Queen's University, Department of Economics in its series Working Papers with number 1115.

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Length: 76 pages
Date of creation: Mar 2006
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:qed:wpaper:1115

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Keywords: immigration policy; points system; Canadian immigration;

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Cited by:
  1. Arthur Sweetman & Casey Warman, 2012. "The Structure of Canada`s Immigration System and Canadian Labour Market Outcomes," Working Papers 1292, Queen's University, Department of Economics.
  2. McDonald, James Ted & Worswick, Christopher, 2011. "Incidence and Returns to Apprenticeship Training in Canada: the Role of Family Background and Immigrant Status," CLSSRN working papers clsrn_admin-2011-3, Vancouver School of Economics, revised 27 Jan 2011.
  3. Ferrer, Ana M. & Picot, Garnett & Riddell, W. Craig, 2012. "New Directions in Immigration Policy: Canada’s Evolving Approach to Immigration Selection," CLSSRN working papers clsrn_admin-2012-34, Vancouver School of Economics, revised 30 Nov 2012.
  4. Susumu Imai & Derek Stacey & Casey Warman, 2011. "From Engineer to Taxi Driver? Occupational Skills and the Economic Outcomes of Immigrants," Working Papers 1275, Queen's University, Department of Economics.
  5. McHale, John & Rogers, Keith, 2009. "Selecting Economic Immigrants: An Actuarial Approach," CLSSRN working papers clsrn_admin-2009-64, Vancouver School of Economics, revised 28 Nov 2009.
  6. James Ted McDonald & Casey Warman & Christopher Worswick, 2011. "Immigrant Selection Systems and Occupational Outcomes of International Medical Graduates in Canada and the United States," Working Papers 1285, Queen's University, Department of Economics.
  7. Aydemir, Abdurrahman, 2012. "Skill Based Immigrant Selection and Labor Market Outcomes by Visa Category," IZA Discussion Papers 6433, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  8. Philip Oreopoulos, 2011. "Why Do Skilled Immigrants Struggle in the Labor Market? A Field Experiment with Thirteen Thousand Resumes," American Economic Journal: Economic Policy, American Economic Association, vol. 3(4), pages 148-71, November.
  9. Emiko Todoroki & Matteo Vaccani & Wameek Noor, 2009. "The Canada-Caribbean Remittance Corridor : Fostering Formal Remittances to Haiti and Jamaica through Effective Regulation," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 5947, January.
  10. Abbott, Michael & Beach, Charles M., 2009. "Immigrant Earnings Distributions and Earnings Mobility in Canada: Evidence for the 1982 Landing Cohort from IMDB Micro Data," CLSSRN working papers clsrn_admin-2009-22, Vancouver School of Economics, revised 13 Mar 2009.
  11. James Ted McDonald & Christopher Worswick, 2013. "Intergenerational Implications of Immigration Policy on Apprenticeship Training and the Educational Distribution in Canada," Canadian Public Policy, University of Toronto Press, vol. 39(s1), pages 165-185, May.
  12. Sweetman, Arthur & Warman, Casey, 2009. "Temporary Foreign Workers and Former International Students as a Source of Permanent Immigration," CLSSRN working papers clsrn_admin-2009-34, Vancouver School of Economics, revised 22 Jun 2009.
  13. Robin Banerjee & William B.P. Robson, 2009. "Faster, Younger, Richer? The Fond Hope and Sobering Reality of Immigration's Impact on Canada's Demographic and Economic Future," C.D. Howe Institute Commentary, C.D. Howe Institute, issue 291, July.

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