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Togo: Failed election and misguided aid at the roots of economic misery

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  • Kohnert, Dirk

Abstract

The holding of early parliamentary elections in Togo on October 14, 2007, most likely the first free and fair Togolese elections since decades, are considered internationally as a litmus test of despotic African regimes’ propensity to change towards democratization and economic prosperity. Western donors took Togo as model to test their approach of political conditionality of aid, which had been emphasised as corner stone of the joint EU-Africa strategy. Recent empirical findings on the linkage between democratization and economic performance in Western Africa are challenged because of lack of viable data. It is open to question, whether Togo’s expected economic consolidation and growth will be due to democratization of its institutions or to improved external environment, notably the growing competition between global players for African natural resources.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by University Library of Munich, Germany in its series MPRA Paper with number 5207.

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Date of creation: 08 Oct 2007
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Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:5207

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Keywords: democratization; governance; economic growth; development; LDCs; Africa;

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  1. Barro, Robert J, 1996. " Democracy and Growth," Journal of Economic Growth, Springer, Springer, vol. 1(1), pages 1-27, March.
  2. Elias Papaioannou & Gregorios Siourounis, 2008. "Democratisation and Growth," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, Royal Economic Society, vol. 118(532), pages 1520-1551, October.
  3. Paul R. Masson & Xavier Debrun & Catherine A. Pattillo, 2002. "Monetary Union in West Africa," IMF Working Papers, International Monetary Fund 02/226, International Monetary Fund.
  4. Jan Willem Gunning & Paul Collier, 1999. "Explaining African Economic Performance," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, American Economic Association, vol. 37(1), pages 64-111, March.
  5. Torsten Persson & Guido Tabellini, 2006. "Democracy and Development: The Devil in the Details," Levine's Bibliography 122247000000001139, UCLA Department of Economics.
  6. Kanbur, Ravi, 2004. "The African Peer Review Mechanism (Aprm): An Assessment Of Concept And Design," Working Papers, Cornell University, Department of Applied Economics and Management 127132, Cornell University, Department of Applied Economics and Management.
  7. Kohnert, Dirk, 2007. "On the Renaissance of African Modes of Thought - The Example of the Belief in Magic and Witchcraft," MPRA Paper 7019, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  8. Benno J. Ndulu & Stephen A. O'Connell, 1999. "Governance and Growth in Sub-Saharan Africa," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, American Economic Association, vol. 13(3), pages 41-66, Summer.
  9. John F. Helliwell, 1992. "Empirical Linkages Between Democracy and Economic Growth," NBER Working Papers 4066, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  10. Dani Rodrik & Romain Wacziarg, 2005. "Do Democratic Transitions Produce Bad Economic Outcomes?," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, American Economic Association, vol. 95(2), pages 50-55, May.
  11. Arne Bigsten & Abebe Shimeles, 2007. "Can Africa Reduce Poverty by Half by 2015?," Development Policy Review, Overseas Development Institute, Overseas Development Institute, vol. 25(2), pages 147-166, 03.
  12. Kohnert, Dirk, 2005. "Die UEMOA und die CFA-Zone: Eine neue Kooperations-Kultur im frankophonen Afrika?
    [The WEAMU and the Franc CFA-Zone: A new culture of co-operation within Francophone Africa?]
    ," MPRA Paper 5436, University Library of Munich, Germany.
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