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Rethinking the Role of Fiscal Policy

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  • Martin S. Feldstein

Abstract

As recently as two years ago there was a widespread consensus among economists that fiscal policy is not useful as a countercyclical instrument. Now governments in Washington and around the world are developing massive fiscal stimulus packages, supported by a wide range of economists in universities, governments, and businesses. Why has this change occurred? What are the principles for designing a potentially useful fiscal stimulus? And what will happen if the current fiscal stimulus fails?

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc in its series NBER Working Papers with number 14684.

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Date of creation: Jan 2009
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Publication status: published as Martin Feldstein, 2009. "Rethinking the Role of Fiscal Policy," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 99(2), pages 556-59, May.
Handle: RePEc:nbr:nberwo:14684

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  1. Martin Feldstein
    by Metablog Obserwatora Finansowego in Obserwator Finansowy on 2009-12-10 11:59:58
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Cited by:
  1. Stijn Claessens & M. Ayhan Kose, 2013. "Financial Crises Explanations, Types, and Implications," IMF Working Papers 13/28, International Monetary Fund.
  2. Andreas Hoffmann & Gunther Schnabl, 2011. "A Vicious Cycle of Manias, Crises and Asymmetric Policy Responses – An Overinvestment View," The World Economy, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 34(3), pages 382-403, 03.
  3. Carlos Gustavo Machicado & Paúl Estrada, 2012. "Fiscal policy and economic growth: a simulation analysis for Bolivia," Analítika, Analítika - Revista de Análisis Estadístico/Journal of Statistical Analysis, vol. 4(2), pages 57-79, Diciembre.
  4. Hong, Kiseok & Tang, Hsiao Chink, 2012. "Crises in Asia: Recovery and policy responses," Journal of Asian Economics, Elsevier, vol. 23(6), pages 654-668.
  5. Vivek Prasad, 2014. "Balanced budget stimulus with tax cuts in a liquidity constrained economy," Birkbeck Working Papers in Economics and Finance 1401, Birkbeck, Department of Economics, Mathematics & Statistics.
  6. Georgi Manliev, 2012. "Re-evaluation the stabilization function of the fiscal policy (English)," Economic Thought journal, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences - Economic Research Institute, issue 5, pages 30-54.
  7. Yongheng Deng & Randall Morck & Jing Wu & Bernard Yeung, 2011. "Monetary and Fiscal Stimuli, Ownership Structure, and China's Housing Market," NBER Working Papers 16871, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  8. Michael W. M. Roos, 2009. "Die deutsche Fiskalpolitik während der Wirtschaftskrise 2008/2009," Perspektiven der Wirtschaftspolitik, Verein für Socialpolitik, vol. 10(4), pages 389-412, November.
  9. Georgi Manliev, 2012. "Re-evaluation the stabilization function of the fiscal policy (Bulgarian)," Economic Thought journal, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences - Economic Research Institute, issue 5, pages 3-29.
  10. Kristina Spantig, 2013. "Keynesian Dominance in Crisis Therapy," Global Financial Markets Working Paper Series 45-2013, Friedrich-Schiller-University Jena.
  11. Angelopoulos, Konstantinos & Malley, Jim & Philippopoulos, Apostolis, 2011. "The welfare implications of resource allocation policies under uncertainty: The case of public education spending," Journal of Macroeconomics, Elsevier, vol. 33(2), pages 176-192, June.
  12. Fukuda, Shin-ichi & Yamada, Junji, 2011. "Stock price targeting and fiscal deficit in Japan: Why did the fiscal deficit increase during Japan’s lost decades?," Journal of the Japanese and International Economies, Elsevier, vol. 25(4), pages 447-464.
  13. Mertens, Karel & Ravn, Morten O., 2010. "Fiscal Policy in an Expectations Driven Liquidity Trap," CEPR Discussion Papers 7931, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  14. Stephen A. Marglin & Peter Spiegler, 2013. "Where Did All the Money Go? Stimulus in Fact and Fantasy," INET Research Notes 31, Institute for New Economic Thinking (INET).
  15. Furlanetto, Francesco, 2011. "Fiscal stimulus and the role of wage rigidity," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 35(4), pages 512-527, April.
  16. Vojtěch Roženský, 2012. "Mandatory Expenditure and the Flexibility of Fiscal Policy in the Czech Republic," Politická ekonomie, University of Economics, Prague, vol. 2012(1), pages 40-57.
  17. Alan J. Auerbach & William G. Gale, 2009. "Activist fiscal policy to stabilize economic activity," Proceedings - Economic Policy Symposium - Jackson Hole, Federal Reserve Bank of Kansas City, pages 327-374.
  18. Ryu-ichiro Murota & Yoshiyasu Ono, 2010. "A Reinterpretation of the Keynesian Consumption Function and Multiplier Effect," ISER Discussion Paper 0779, Institute of Social and Economic Research, Osaka University.
  19. Virkola, Tuomo, 2014. "Exchange Rate Regime, Fiscal Foresight and the Effectiveness of Fiscal Policy in a Small Open Economy," ETLA Reports 20, The Research Institute of the Finnish Economy.

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