Advanced Search
MyIDEAS: Login

Evaluating The Distributional Implications Of Price Movements: Methodology, Application And Australian Evidence

Contents:

Author Info

  • Aaron Nicholas
  • Ranjan Ray
  • Rebecca Valenzuela

Abstract

This paper investigates the distributional implication of inflation in Australia. It proposes and applies a method of evaluating the nature and size of the inequality bias of price movements. In the process, the study introduces a new demographic demand model that yields sensible and well determined estimates of the general equivalence scale and the size economies of scale. The study finds that inflation in Australia during the 1990s had an inequality increasing bias and that this bias increased in the late 1990s and the first part of the new millennium. The study also provides evidence on the decomposition of overall inequality between demographic groups and compares the decomposition between the nominal and real expenditure inequalities.

Download Info

If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.
File URL: http://www.buseco.monash.edu.au/eco/research/papers/2008/3308evaluatingnicholasrayvalenzuela.pdf
Download Restriction: no

Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Monash University, Department of Economics in its series Monash Economics Working Papers with number 33/08.

as in new window
Length: 29 pages
Date of creation: 03 Nov 2008
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:mos:moswps:2008-33

Contact details of provider:
Postal: Department of Economics, Monash University, Victoria 3800, Australia
Phone: +61-3-9905-2493
Fax: +61-3-9905-5476
Email:
Web page: http://www.buseco.monash.edu.au/eco/
More information through EDIRC

Order Information:
Email:
Web: http://www.buseco.monash.edu.au/eco/research/papers/

Related research

Keywords: Price scaling; demographic demand; real expenditure inequality; inequality aversion.;

Other versions of this item:

Find related papers by JEL classification:

This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:

References

No references listed on IDEAS
You can help add them by filling out this form.

Citations

Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
as in new window

Cited by:
  1. Manisha Chakrabarty & Amita Majumder & Ranjan Ray, 2012. "Preferences, Spatial Prices and Inequality," Monash Economics Working Papers 52-12, Monash University, Department of Economics.
  2. Aaron Nicholas & Ranjan Ray, 2012. "Duration and Persistence in Multidimensional Deprivation: Methodology and Australian Application," The Economic Record, The Economic Society of Australia, vol. 88(280), pages 106-126, 03.
  3. Kenneth W Clements & Grace Gao, 2011. "Quality, Quantity, Spending and Prices," Economics Discussion / Working Papers 11-12, The University of Western Australia, Department of Economics.
  4. Ankita Mishra & Ranjan Ray, 2011. "Prices, Inequality, And Poverty: Methodology And Indian Evidence," Review of Income and Wealth, International Association for Research in Income and Wealth, vol. 57(3), pages 428-448, 09.
  5. Abhimanyu Dadu & Namrata Gulati, 2014. "Inequality, neighborhoods and variation in prices," Indira Gandhi Institute of Development Research, Mumbai Working Papers 2014-001, Indira Gandhi Institute of Development Research, Mumbai, India.
  6. Hooi Hooi Lean & Ma. Rebecca Valenzuela, 2012. "Inequality in Australia 1983-2004: A Stochastic Dominance Approach," Monash Economics Working Papers 06-12, Monash University, Department of Economics.

Lists

This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

Statistics

Access and download statistics

Corrections

When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:mos:moswps:2008-33. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Simon Angus).

If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.