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Chartbook of economic inequality

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Author Info

  • Anthony B. Atkinson

    (Nuffield College, Oxford, LSE and Institute for New Economic Thinking at the Oxford Martin School)

  • Salvatore Morelli

    (CSEF – University of Naples – Federico II and Institute for New Economic Thinking at the Oxford Martin School)

Abstract

The purpose of this Chartbook is to present a summary of evidence about long-run changes in economic inequality – primarily income, earnings, and wealth – for 25 countries covering more than one hundred years. There is a range of countries and they account for more than a third of the world’s population: Argentina, Brazil, Australia, Canada, Finland, France, Germany, Iceland, India, Indonesia, Italy, Japan, Malaysia, Mauritius, Netherlands, New Zealand, Norway, Portugal, Singapore, South Africa, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, the UK and the US. The results are presented in 25 charts, one for each country, together with a description of the sources. The underlying figures are available for download at www.chartbookofeconomicinequality.com.

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File URL: http://www.ecineq.org/milano/WP/ECINEQ2014-324.pdf
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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by ECINEQ, Society for the Study of Economic Inequality in its series Working Papers with number 324.

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Length: 66 pages
Date of creation: Mar 2014
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:inq:inqwps:ecineq2014-324

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References

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  1. Arthur B. Kennickell, 2009. "Ponds and streams: wealth and income in the U.S., 1989 to 2007," Finance and Economics Discussion Series 2009-13, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.).
  2. Atkinson, A B, 2008. "The Changing Distribution of Earnings in OECD Countries," OUP Catalogue, Oxford University Press, number 9780199532438, September.
  3. Thomas Piketty & Emmanuel Saez, 2003. "Income Inequality In The United States, 1913-1998," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, MIT Press, vol. 118(1), pages 1-39, February.
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Cited by:
  1. Pablo García, 2014. "Equidad y Estabilidad Macrofinanciera," Economic Policy Papers Central Bank of Chile 49, Central Bank of Chile.
  2. Salvatore Morelli & Timothy Smeeding & Jeffrey Thompson, 2014. "Post-1970 Trends in Within-Country Inequality and Poverty: Rich and Middle Income Countries," CSEF Working Papers 356, Centre for Studies in Economics and Finance (CSEF), University of Naples, Italy.
  3. A.B. Atkinson, 2013. "Wealth and Inheritance in Britain from 1896 to the Present," CASE Papers /178, Centre for Analysis of Social Exclusion, LSE.

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