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East African Community: Pre-conditions for an Effective Monetary Union

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  • Durevall, Dick

    ()
    (Department of Economics, School of Business, Economics and Law, Göteborg University)

Abstract

Kenya, Tanzania and Uganda signed the Treaty for the establishment of the East African Community (EAC) in 1999, which entered into force in July 2000. In 2007 it was signed by Burundi and Rwanda. According to the Treaty, EAC should first form a customs union, then a common market and a monetary union, and finally a political union. The Customs Union was formally completed in 2010, and Common Market Protocol was signed in 2009. Currently the intention is to sign the East African Monetary Union protocol 2012, while the date for actual implementation of the common currency is uncertain. The purpose of this note is to discuss preconditions for an effective monetary union among the EAC members, with a focus on Rwanda. It first outlines potential economic benefits and costs of a monetary union, and then discusses political and institutional preconditions. It concludes that although there are potentially substantive economic net-benefits, a monetary union is a risky project for political reasons. The political will among policymakers is key to successful implementation, and it could vanish with a change of government or because of discontent among influential lobby groups. However, the process towards forming are monetary union is appears to be highly beneficial the EAC members, both directly by improving monetary policy and indirectly by contributing to economic integration.

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File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/2077/28233
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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by University of Gothenburg, Department of Economics in its series Working Papers in Economics with number 520.

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Length: 39 pages
Date of creation: 20 Dec 2011
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:hhs:gunwpe:0520

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Postal: Department of Economics, School of Business, Economics and Law, University of Gothenburg, Box 640, SE 405 30 GÖTEBORG, Sweden
Phone: 031-773 10 00
Web page: http://www.handels.gu.se/econ/
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Keywords: Africa; Burundi; common currency; EAC; Kenya; monetary union; regional integration; Rwanda; Tanzania; Uganda;

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  1. Francis Teal & Geeta Kingdon & Justin Sandefur, 2005. "Labor Market Flexibility, Wages and Incomes in sub-Saharan Africa in the 1990s," Economics Series Working Papers GPRG-WPS-030, University of Oxford, Department of Economics.
  2. Chris Hunt, 2005. "A fresh look at the merits of a currency union," Reserve Bank of New Zealand Bulletin, Reserve Bank of New Zealand, vol. 68, December.
  3. Buiter, Willem H, 2008. "Economic, Political, and Institutional Prerequisites for Monetary Union Among the Members of the Gulf Cooperation Council," CEPR Discussion Papers 6639, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  4. Cheikbossian, Guillaume, 2002. " Seigniorage, Delegation and Common Currency: Why Monetary Unions May Fail?," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 112(3-4), pages 305-18, September.
  5. Guillaume Cheikbossian, 2001. "When a Monetary Union Fails: A Parable," Open Economies Review, Springer, vol. 12(2), pages 181-195, April.
  6. Paul R. Masson & Xavier Debrun & Catherine A. Pattillo, 2002. "Monetary Union in West Africa: Who Might Gain, Who Might Lose, and Why?," IMF Working Papers 02/226, International Monetary Fund.
  7. Burcu Aydin, 2010. "Exchange Rate Assessment for Sub-Saharan Economies," IMF Working Papers 10/162, International Monetary Fund.
  8. Michael D. Bordo & Lars Jonung, 1999. "The Future of EMU: What Does the History of Monetary Unions Tell Us?," NBER Working Papers 7365, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  9. Kishor, N. Kundan & Ssozi, John, 2009. "Is the East African Community an Optimum Currency Area?," MPRA Paper 17645, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  10. Buigut, Steven K. & Valev, Neven T., 2005. "Is the proposed East African Monetary Union an optimal currency area? a structural vector autoregression analysis," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 33(12), pages 2119-2133, December.
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