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Technical Progress And Jobs

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Author Info

  • NICKELL, S.
  • KOMG, P.

Abstract

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by London School of Economics - Centre for Labour Economics in its series Papers with number 366.

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Length: 32 pages
Date of creation: 1989
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:fth:lseple:366

Contact details of provider:
Postal: LONDON SCHOOL OF ECONOMICS AND POLITICAL SCIENCE, CENTER FOR LABOUR ECONOMICS, HOUGHTON STREET LONDON WC2A 2AE ENGLAND.
Phone: +44 (020) 7405 7686
Web page: http://www.lse.ac.uk/
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Related research

Keywords: technological change ; labour market ; productivity ; demand;

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Citations

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Cited by:
  1. Alan Manning, 2004. "We can work it out: the impact of technological change on the demand for low skill workers," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 19948, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
  2. Harrison, Rupert & Jaumandreu, Jordi & Mairesse, Jacques & Peters, Bettina, 2005. "Does innovation stimulate employment? A firm-level analysis using comparable micro data on four European countries," MPRA Paper 1245, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  3. Martin Neil Baily & Eric J. Bartelsman & John Haltiwanger, 1994. "Downsizing and Productivity Growth: Myth or Reality?," NBER Working Papers 4741, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  4. Sami Saafi, 2010. "Conséquences de la diffusion des innovations technologiques sur l'emploi industriel en Tunisie : Une analyse par les données de panel," Working Papers hal-00477357, HAL.
  5. Garcia, Angel & Jaumandreu, Jordi & Rodriguez, Cesar, 2004. "Innovation and jobs: evidence from manufacturing firms," MPRA Paper 1204, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  6. Sami Saafi, 2008. "Diffusion des innovations technologiques, emploi et théorie de compensation (The diffusion of technological innovations, employment and the compensation theory)," Working Papers 184, Laboratoire de Recherche sur l'Industrie et l'Innovation. ULCO / Research Unit on Industry and Innovation.
  7. Kevin Denny, 1997. "Productivity and trade unions in British manufacturing industry 1973-85," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 29(10), pages 1403-1409.

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