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Author Info

  • Pardey, Philip G.
  • Alston, Julian M.
  • Christian, Jason E.
  • Fan, Shenggen.

Abstract

"This report spells out the benefits to the United States from its partnership with the CGIAR. Using wheat and rice to illustrate the gains from international research on important food crops, the report shows that U.S. investments in CGIAR wheat and rice research have paid off many times over for U.S. farmers" Pref.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI) in its series Food policy reports with number 6.

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Date of creation: 1996
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:fpr:fprepo:6

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Cited by:
  1. Gray, Richard S. & Malla, Stavroula & Tran, Kien C., 2005. "Pecuniary, Non-Pecuniary, and Downstream Research Spillovers: The Case of Canola," 2005 International Congress, August 23-27, 2005, Copenhagen, Denmark 24776, European Association of Agricultural Economists.
  2. Douglas Gollin & Stephen Parente & Robert Evenson & Douglas Gollin, 2002. "The Green Revolution: An End of Century Perspective," Center for Development Economics 171, Department of Economics, Williams College.
  3. Watson, Robert & Crawford, Michael & Farley, Sara, 2003. "Strategic approaches to science and technology in development," Policy Research Working Paper Series 3026, The World Bank.
  4. Gray, Richard S. & Malla, Stavroula & Tran, Kien C., 2003. "An Empirical Analysis Of Public And Private Spillovers Within The Canola Biotech Industry," 2003 Annual meeting, July 27-30, Montreal, Canada 22137, American Agricultural Economics Association (New Name 2008: Agricultural and Applied Economics Association).
  5. Roseboom, Johannes & Pardey, Philip G. & Beintema, Nienke M., 1998. "The changing organizational basis of African agricultural research:," EPTD discussion papers 37, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
  6. Kamanda, Josey & Birner, Regina & Bantilan, Cynthia, 2013. "Strategic positioning of international agricultural research centres: Comparative advantage and trade-offs from a transaction cost economics perspective," 2013 Conference (57th), February 5-8, 2013, Sydney, Australia 152160, Australian Agricultural and Resource Economics Society.
  7. Brennan, John P. & Quade, Kathryn J., 2004. "Analysis of the Impact of CIMMYT Research on the Australian Wheat Industry," Research Reports 42505, New South Wales Department of Primary Industries Research Economists.
  8. Dana G. Dalrymple, 2008. "International agricultural research as a global public good: concepts, the CGIAR experience and policy issues," Journal of International Development, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 20(3), pages 347-379.
  9. Pardey, Philip G. & Beintema, Nienke M. & Dehmer, Steven & Wood, Stanley, 2006. "Agricultural research: a growing global divide?," Food policy reports 17, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
  10. Heisey, Paul W. & Morris, Michael L., 2002. "Practical Challenges To Estimating The Benefits Of Agricultural R&D: The Case Of Plant Breeding Research," 2002 Annual meeting, July 28-31, Long Beach, CA 19828, American Agricultural Economics Association (New Name 2008: Agricultural and Applied Economics Association).
  11. Alston, Julian M. & Wyatt, T. J. & Pardey, Philip G. & Marra, Michele C. & Chan-Kang, Connie, 2000. "A meta-analysis of rates of return to agricultural R & D: ex pede Herculem?," Research reports 113, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).

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