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A Dilution Cost Approach to Financial Intermediation and Securities Markets

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  • Xavier Freixas
  • Patrick Bolton

Abstract

This paper proposes a model of financial markets and corporate finance, with asymmetric information and no taxes, where equity issues, Back debt and Bond financing may all co-exist in equilibrium. The paper emphasizes the relationship Banking aspect of financial intermediation: firms turn to banks as a source of investment mainly because banks are good at helping them through times of financial distress. The debt restructuring service that banks may offer, however, is costly. Therefore, the firms which do not expect to be financially distressed prefer to obtain a cheaper market source of funding through bank or equity issues. This explains why bank lending and bond financial may co-exist in equilibrium. The reason why firms or banks also issue equity in our model is simply to avoid bankruptcy. Banks have the additional motive that they need to satisfy minimum capital adequacy requirements. Several types of equilibria are possible, one of which has all the main characteristics of a ¶credit crunch¶. This multiplicity implies that the channels of monetary policy may depend on the type of equilibrium that prevails, leading sometimes to support a ¶credit view¶ and other time the classical ¶money view¶.

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File URL: http://www.lse.ac.uk/fmg/workingPapers/discussionPapers/fmg_pdfs/dp305.pdf
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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Financial Markets Group in its series FMG Discussion Papers with number dp305.

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Date of creation: Oct 1998
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Handle: RePEc:fmg:fmgdps:dp305

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Web page: http://www.lse.ac.uk/fmg/

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  1. repec:hal:wpaper:hal-00574161 is not listed on IDEAS
  2. repec:hal:cepnwp:hal-00574161 is not listed on IDEAS
  3. A.F. Tieman, 2003. "Spillover of Domestic Regulation to Emerging Markets," DNB Staff Reports (discontinued) 90, Netherlands Central Bank.
  4. Ursel Baumann & Glenn Hoggarth & Darren Pain, 2005. "The substitution of bank for non-bank corporate finance: evidence for the United Kingdom," Bank of England working papers 274, Bank of England.

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