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Technological adaptation, cities and new work

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  • Jeffrey Lin

Abstract

Where does adaptation to innovation take place? The author presents evidence on the role of agglomeration economies in the application of new knowledge to production. All else equal, workers are more likely to be observed in new work in locations that are initially dense in both college graduates and industry variety. This pattern is consistent with economies of density from the geographic concentration of factors and markets related to technological adaptation. A main contribution is to use a new measure, based on revisions to occupation classifications, to closely characterize cross-sectional differences across U.S. cities in adaptation to technological change. Worker-level results also provide new evidence on the skill bias of recent innovations.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Federal Reserve Bank of Philadelphia in its series Working Papers with number 09-17.

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Date of creation: 2009
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Handle: RePEc:fip:fedpwp:09-17

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Related research

Keywords: Cities and towns ; Urban economics ; Labor market ; Job creation ; Technological innovations;

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Blog mentions

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  1. Papers of the Day
    by ryan in The bellows on 2009-10-05 20:30:01
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Cited by:
  1. Bleakley, Hoyt & Lin, Jeffrey, 2012. "Thick-market effects and churning in the labor market: Evidence from US cities," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 72(2), pages 87-103.
  2. Emek Basker, 2012. "Raising the Barcode Scanner: Technology and Productivity in the Retail Sector," NBER Working Papers 17825, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  3. repec:gen:geneem:13121 is not listed on IDEAS
  4. Lin, Jeffrey, 2014. "The paper trail of knowledge transfers," Business Review, Federal Reserve Bank of Philadelphia, Federal Reserve Bank of Philadelphia, issue Q2, pages 1-6.
  5. Guy Michaels & Ferdinand Rauch & Stephen J. Redding, 2013. "Task specialization in U.S. cities from 1880-2000," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library 48925, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
  6. Antonio accetturo & Alberto Dalmazzo & Guido De Blasio, 2011. "Skill Polarization in Local Labour Markets under Share-Altering Technical Change," Department of Economics University of Siena, Department of Economics, University of Siena 625, Department of Economics, University of Siena.
  7. Gerald A. Carlino, 2011. "Three keys to the city: resources, agglomeration economies, and sorting," Business Review, Federal Reserve Bank of Philadelphia, Federal Reserve Bank of Philadelphia, issue Q3, pages 1-13.
  8. Doms, Mark & Lewis, Ethan & Robb, Alicia, 2010. "Local labor force education, new business characteristics, and firm performance," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 67(1), pages 61-77, January.
  9. repec:gen:geneem:14012 is not listed on IDEAS
  10. Gerald Carlino & William R. Kerr, 2014. "Agglomeration and Innovation," Harvard Business School Working Papers, Harvard Business School 15-007, Harvard Business School.
  11. Jeffrey Lin, 2011. "Urban productivity advantages from job search and matching," Business Review, Federal Reserve Bank of Philadelphia, Federal Reserve Bank of Philadelphia, issue Q1, pages 9-16.
  12. Moretti, Enrico, 2014. "Are cities the new growth escalator ?," Policy Research Working Paper Series, The World Bank 6881, The World Bank.

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