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Are Women Opting Out? Debunking the Myth

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  • Heather Boushey

Abstract

This report refutes the widespread notion that women are increasingly likely to stop working when they have kids.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Center for Economic and Policy Research (CEPR) in its series CEPR Reports and Issue Briefs with number 2005-36.

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Date of creation: Nov 2005
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Handle: RePEc:epo:papers:2005-36

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References

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  1. Heather Boushey, 2008. "Family Friendly Policies: Helping Mothers Make Ends Meet," Review of Social Economy, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 66(1), pages 51-70.
  2. Heather Boushey & Dean Baker & David Rosnick, 2005. "Gender Bias in the Current Economic Recovery? Declining Employment Rates for Women in the 21st Century," CEPR Reports and Issue Briefs 2005-24, Center for Economic and Policy Research (CEPR).
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Citations

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Cited by:
  1. Claudia Goldin, 2006. "The Quiet Revolution that Transformed Women's Employment, Education, and Family," NBER Working Papers 11953, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  2. Saul D. Hoffman, 2008. "The Changing Impact of Marriage and Children on Women’s Labor Force Participation," Working Papers 08-19, University of Delaware, Department of Economics.
  3. Qingyan Shang & Bruce Weinberg, 2013. "Opting for families: recent trends in the fertility of highly educated women," Journal of Population Economics, Springer, vol. 26(1), pages 5-32, January.
  4. Macunovich, Diane J., 2009. "Reversals in the Patterns of Women's Labor Supply in the U.S., 1976-2009," IZA Discussion Papers 4512, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  5. Julie L. Hotchkiss & M. Melinda Pitts & Mary Beth Walker, 2010. "Assessing the impact of education and marriage on labor market exit decisions of women," Working Paper 2010-02, Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta.
  6. Antecol, Heather, 2010. "The Opt-Out Revolution: A Descriptive Analysis," IZA Discussion Papers 5089, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  7. Mary C. Still, 2006. "The opt-out revolution in the United States: implications for modern organizations," Managerial and Decision Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 27(2-3), pages 159-171.
  8. Hélène Périvier-Timbeau, 2008. "Les femmes sur le marché du travail aux Etats-Unis," Sciences Po publications 2008-12, Sciences Po.
  9. Jane Leber Herr & Catherine Wolfram, 2009. "Work Environment and “Opt-Out" Rates at Motherhood Across High-Education Career Paths," NBER Working Papers 14717, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  10. Julie L. Hotchkiss & M. Melinda Pitts & Mary Beth Walker, 2008. "Working with children? the probability of mothers exiting the workforce at time of birth," Working Paper 2008-08, Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta.
  11. Hélène Périvier, 2008. "Les femmes sur le marché du travail aux États-Unis," Documents de Travail de l'OFCE 2008-12, Observatoire Francais des Conjonctures Economiques (OFCE).

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