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The Secular Trend in the Biological Standard of Living in the United Kingdom, 1730-1860

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  • John Komlos

    ()
    (The Institute of Economic History, Department of Economics, University of Munich)

Abstract

Corrects some of the statistical mistakes of previous studies of the trend in the height of British soldiers in the 18th and 19th centuries. Finds that heights decreased substantially in the late-18th century in keeping with many other findings. The inference is that an incipient Malthusian crisis was threatening the United Kingdom, as it did Continental Europe on the eve of the Industrial Revolution.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Department of Economics, University of Munich in its series Articles by John Komlos with number 19.

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Publication status: published in Economic History Review, 1993, 46, 115-144
Handle: RePEc:ehb:komart:19

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Web page: http://www.vwl.uni-muenchen.de/ls_komlos/
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Keywords: heights; biological standard of living; United Kingdom; Industrial Revolution;

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Cited by:
  1. Donald Wellington & Sourushe Zandvakili, 2001. "The globalization of poverty according to Malthus," Forum for Social Economics, Springer, vol. 31(1), pages 59-71, September.
  2. Penttinen, Antti & Moltchanova, Elena & Nummela, Ilkka, 2013. "Bayesian modeling of the evolution of male height in 18th century Finland from incomplete data," Economics & Human Biology, Elsevier, vol. 11(4), pages 405-415.
  3. Roderick Floud & Bernard Harris, 1997. "Health, Height, and Welfare: Britain, 1700-1980," NBER Chapters, in: Health and Welfare during Industrialization, pages 91-126 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  4. A'Hearn, Brian & Komlos, John, 2003. "Improvements in Maximum Likelihood Estimators of Truncated Normal Samples with Prior Knowledge of σ," Discussion Papers in Economics 51, University of Munich, Department of Economics.
  5. Martine Mariotti, 2012. "Living Standards In South Africa's Former Homelands," CEH Discussion Papers 003, Centre for Economic History, Research School of Economics, Australian National University.
  6. Komlos, John, 2003. "How to (and How Not to) Analyze Deficient Height Samples," Discussion Papers in Economics 56, University of Munich, Department of Economics.
  7. Lee A. Craig & Thomas Weiss, 1997. "Nutritional Status and Agricultural Surpluses in the Antebellum United States," NBER Historical Working Papers 0099, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  8. Nicholas Crafts, 1997. "Some Dimensions of the Quality of Life during the British Industrial Revolution," CEP Discussion Papers dp0339, Centre for Economic Performance, LSE.
  9. Komlos, John, 2003. "On the Biological Standard of Living of Eighteenth-Century Americans: Taller, Richer, Healthier," Discussion Papers in Economics 53, University of Munich, Department of Economics.
  10. Tirthankar Roy, 2012. "Consumption Of Cotton Cloth In India, 1795–1940," Australian Economic History Review, Economic History Society of Australia and New Zealand, vol. 52(1), pages 61-84, 03.
  11. Alexander Rathke & Samad Sarferaz, 2010. "Malthus was right: new evidence from a time-varying VAR," IEW - Working Papers 477, Institute for Empirical Research in Economics - University of Zurich.
  12. Yoko Akachi & David Canning, 2008. "The Mortality and Morbidity Transitions in Sub-Saharan Africa: Evidence from Adult Heights," PGDA Working Papers 3308, Program on the Global Demography of Aging.
  13. Robert Rudolf, 2012. "Rural Reforms, Agricultural Productivity, and the Biological Standard of Living in South Korea, 1941-1974," Courant Research Centre: Poverty, Equity and Growth - Discussion Papers 106, Courant Research Centre PEG.
  14. Komlos, John & Cinnirella, Francesco, 2005. "European Heights in the Early 18th Century," Discussion Papers in Economics 572, University of Munich, Department of Economics.
  15. Robert Allen & Robert C. Allen, 2007. "Pessimism Preserved: Real Wages in the British Industrial Revolution," Economics Series Working Papers 314, University of Oxford, Department of Economics.
  16. Coppola, Michela, 2013. "The biological standard of living and mortality in Central Italy at the beginning of the 19th century," Economics & Human Biology, Elsevier, vol. 11(4), pages 453-464.
  17. Robert Allen & Robert C. Allen, 2007. "Engel`s Pause: A Pessimist`s Guide to the British Industrial Revolution," Economics Series Working Papers 315, University of Oxford, Department of Economics.

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