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Historical Origins of Brazilian Relative Backwardness

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Author Info

  • Alexandre Rands Barros

    ()
    (Datametrica Consultoria, Pesquisa e Telemarketing)

Abstract

Esse artigo utiliza dados recentes para identificar o período em que o Brasil teve maior perda de PIB per capita relativo em relação a um conjunto de países utilizados como parâmetro de comparação, entre eles Canadá, EUA, Nova Zelândia e Austrália. Além disso, utilizaram-se dados sobre imigração no Brasil nos EUA para identificar o papel da importação de capital humano na geração das disparidades entre Brasil e EUA no século XIX. As conclusões mostram que essa foi responsável por 50% a 88% desse crescimento das desigualdades entre 1820 e 1900. Apesar de constituir uma evidência forte do papel do capital humano, o método utilizado não elimina o papel potencial das instituições na atração dessa mão obra mais qualificada para os EUA.

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File URL: ftp://200.249.56.210/RePEc/dtm/wpaper/Historicaloriginsofrelativebackwardness64.pdf
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File Function: Revised version, 2012.
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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Datamétrica Consultoria Econômica in its series Working Papers with number 64.

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Length: 21 pages
Date of creation: 2010
Date of revision: 2012
Handle: RePEc:dtm:wpaper:64

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Related research

Keywords: Brazilian backwardness; Brazilian growth; immigration; comparative development.;

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  1. Spolaore, Enrico & Wacziarg, Romain, 2012. "How Deep Are the Roots of Economic Development?," CEPR Discussion Papers 8998, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  2. Ashraf, Quamrul & Galor, Oded, 2011. "The 'Out of Africa' Hypothesis, Human Genetic Diversity, and Comparative Economic Development," CEPR Discussion Papers 8500, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  3. William Easterly & Ross Levine, 2012. "The European Origins of Economic Development," NBER Working Papers 18162, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  4. Louis Putterman & David N. Weil, 2008. "Post-1500 Population Flows and the Long Run Determinants of Economic Growth and Inequality," NBER Working Papers 14448, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  5. Kevin H. O'Rourke, 2003. "The Era of Free Migration: Lessons for Today," Trinity Economics Papers 200315, Trinity College Dublin, Department of Economics.
  6. Ran Abramitzky & Leah Boustan & Katherine Eriksson, 2010. "Europe's Tired, Poor, Huddled Masses: Self-Selection and Economic Outcomes in the Age of Mass Migration," Discussion Papers 09-029, Stanford Institute for Economic Policy Research.
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