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Premarital conception and divorce risk in Russia in light of the GGS data

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  • Aiva Jasilioniene

    (Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany)

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    Abstract

    The paper provides an analysis of divorce risk in first marital unions in Russia, with a major focus on the impact of premarital conception on the stability of subsequent marriage. A number of other predictors are also discussed, including age at first marriage, parity and age of the youngest child, parental divorce, place of residence, religion group and calendar period. The analysis is based on data from the Russian Generations and Gender Survey (GGS) carried out in 2004 and applies event history techniques. The results show that marriages induced by pregnancy run a higher divorce risk compared to those contracted without anticipation of childbirth.

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    File URL: http://www.demogr.mpg.de/papers/working/wp-2007-025.pdf
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    Bibliographic Info

    Paper provided by Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany in its series MPIDR Working Papers with number WP-2007-025.

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    Length: 24 pages
    Date of creation: Aug 2007
    Date of revision:
    Handle: RePEc:dem:wpaper:wp-2007-025

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    Web page: http://www.demogr.mpg.de/

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    Keywords: Russian Federation; divorce;

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    1. Torkild Lyngstad, 2004. "The impact of parent's and spouses' education on divorce rates in Norway," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 10(5), pages 121-142, April.
    2. Kelly Musick, 2007. "Cohabitation, nonmarital childbearing, and the marriage process," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 16(9), pages 249-286, April.
    3. Lillard, L.A. & Waite, L.J., 1993. "A Joint Model of Marital Childbearing and Marital Disruption," Papers, RAND - Labor and Population Program 93-02, RAND - Labor and Population Program.
    4. Magdalena M. Muszynska & Hill Kulu, 2006. "Migration and union dissolution in a changing socio-economic context: the case of Russia," MPIDR Working Papers, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany WP-2006-032, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany.
    5. Dimiter Philipov & Aiva Jasilioniene, 2007. "Union formation and fertility in Bulgaria and Russia: a life table description of recent trends," MPIDR Working Papers, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany WP-2007-005, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany.
    6. Sergei Schernov & Harrie Vianen, 1999. "Marital and Fertility Careers of Russian Women Born Between 1910 and 1934," Population and Development Review, The Population Council, Inc., The Population Council, Inc., vol. 25(1), pages 129-143.
    7. Guiping Liu, 2002. "How premarital children and childbearing in current marriage influence divorce of Swedish women in their first marriages," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 7(10), pages 389-406, August.
    8. Becker, Gary S & Landes, Elisabeth M & Michael, Robert T, 1977. "An Economic Analysis of Marital Instability," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, University of Chicago Press, vol. 85(6), pages 1141-87, December.
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    Cited by:
    1. Brienna Perelli-Harris & Michaela Kreyenfeld & Wendy Sigle-Rushton & Renske Keizer & Trude Lappegård & Aiva Jasilioniene & Caroline Berghammer & Paola Di Giulio & Katja Köppen, 2009. "The increase in fertility in cohabitation across Europe: examining the intersection between union status and childbearing," MPIDR Working Papers, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany WP-2009-021, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany.

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