Advanced Search
MyIDEAS: Login

Fertility decisions in the FRG and GDR

Contents:

Author Info

  • Michaela Kreyenfeld

    (Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany)

Registered author(s):

    Abstract

    The aim of this paper is to compare family policies and fertility patterns in the former German Democratic Republic (GDR) and the German Federal Republic (FRG). Among other aspects, both societies particularly differed in the integration of women into the labor market. By contrasting the fertility development in these two societies, this paper aims to illuminate how women’s education and employment relates to fertility decisions in societal contexts that support (in the case of the GDR) and hamper (in the case of the FRG) the compatibility between work and family life. Data for this analysis comes from the German Fertility and Family Survey (of the year 1992). We provide descriptive statistics for all birth parities, but we limit the multivariate event history analysis to first births only.

    Download Info

    If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.
    File URL: http://www.demogr.mpg.de/papers/working/wp-2004-008.pdf
    Download Restriction: no

    Bibliographic Info

    Paper provided by Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany in its series MPIDR Working Papers with number WP-2004-008.

    as in new window
    Length: 45 pages
    Date of creation: Feb 2004
    Date of revision:
    Handle: RePEc:dem:wpaper:wp-2004-008

    Contact details of provider:
    Web page: http://www.demogr.mpg.de/

    Related research

    Keywords: Germany; fertility determinants;

    Find related papers by JEL classification:

    References

    References listed on IDEAS
    Please report citation or reference errors to , or , if you are the registered author of the cited work, log in to your RePEc Author Service profile, click on "citations" and make appropriate adjustments.:
    as in new window
    1. Neyer, Gerda, 2003. "Family Policies and Low Fertility in Western Europe," Discussion Paper 161, Center for Intergenerational Studies, Institute of Economic Research, Hitotsubashi University.
    2. Courgeau, Daniel & Lelievre, Eva, 1993. "Event History Analysis in Demography," OUP Catalogue, Oxford University Press, number 9780198287384.
    3. Siv Gustafsson, 2001. "Optimal age at motherhood. Theoretical and empirical considerations on postponement of maternity in Europe," Journal of Population Economics, Springer, vol. 14(2), pages 225-247.
    4. Gerda R. Neyer, 2003. "Family policies and low fertility in Western Europe," MPIDR Working Papers WP-2003-021, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as in new window

    Cited by:
    1. Sylvia Keim & Andreas Klärner & Laura Bernardi, 2009. "Who is relevant? Exploring fertility relevant social networks," MPIDR Working Papers WP-2009-001, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany.
    2. Cordula Zabel, 2006. "Employment experience and first birth in Great Britain," MPIDR Working Papers WP-2006-029, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany.
    3. Gerda R. Neyer, 2006. "Family policies and fertility in Europe: fertility policies at the intersection of gender policies, employment policies and care policies," MPIDR Working Papers WP-2006-010, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany.
    4. Michaela Kreyenfeld & Rembrandt D. Scholz & Frederik Peters & Ines Wlosnewski, 2010. "The German Birth Order Register - order-specific data generated from perinatal statistics and statistics on out-of-hospital births 2001-2008," MPIDR Working Papers WP-2010-010, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany.
    5. Anna Matysiak & Daniele Vignoli, 2011. "Different women’s employment and fertility behaviours in similar institutional settings: Evidence from Italy and Poland," Working Papers 41, Institute of Statistics and Demography, Warsaw School of Economics.
    6. Katja Köppen, 2006. "Second births in western Germany and France," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 14(14), pages 295-330, April.
    7. Julia Bredtmann & Jochen Kluve & Sandra Schaffner, 2009. "Women's Fertility and Employment Decisions under Two Political Systems - Comparing East and West Germany before Reunification," Ruhr Economic Papers 0149, Rheinisch-Westfälisches Institut für Wirtschaftsforschung, Ruhr-Universität Bochum, Universität Dortmund, Universität Duisburg-Essen.
    8. Kraft, Kornelius & Neimann, Stefanie, 2009. "Effect of Labor Division between Wife and Husband on the Risk of Divorce: Evidence from German Data," IZA Discussion Papers 4515, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    9. Monika Mynarska & Anna Matysiak, 2010. "Women's determination to combine childbearing and paid employment: How can a qualitative approach help us understand quantitative evidence?," Working Papers 26, Institute of Statistics and Demography, Warsaw School of Economics.
    10. Holger von der Lippe, 2006. "On the psychological determinants of fertility: a panorama of concepts and approaches, and evidence from eastern Germany," MPIDR Working Papers WP-2006-050, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany.
    11. Gunnar Andersson & Kirk Scott, 2004. "Labour-market attachment and entry into parenthood: The experience of immigrant women in Sweden," MPIDR Working Papers WP-2004-011, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany.
    12. Laura Bernardi & Andreas Klärner & Holger von der Lippe, 2006. "Perceptions of job instability and the prospects of parenthood. A comparison between Eastern and Western Germany," MPIDR Working Papers WP-2006-017, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany.
    13. Hill Kulu, 2004. "Fertility of internal migrants: comparison between Austria and Poland," MPIDR Working Papers WP-2004-022, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany.
    14. Holger von der Lippe & Gunnar Andersson, 2005. "Becoming a parent in East Germany during the 1990s. The impact of personal considerations on the timing of entry to parenthood," MPIDR Working Papers WP-2005-008, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany.
    15. Elisabetta Santarelli, 2011. "Economic resources and the first child in Italy: A focus on income and job stability," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 25(9), pages 311-336, July.
    16. Michaela Kreyenfeld & Sylvia Zühlke & Kerstin Schmidtke, 2009. "Eignet sich das Mikrozensus-Panel für familiensoziologische Fragestellungen? Untersuchung am Beispiel der Frage nach den ökonomischen Determinanten der Familiengründung," MPIDR Working Papers WP-2009-024, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany.

    Lists

    This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:dem:wpaper:wp-2004-008. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Peter Wilhelm).

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

    If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.