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Capital Mobility

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  • W.H. Buiter
  • K Kletzer

Abstract

This paper considers the effect of fiscal and financial policy on economic growth in open and closed economies, when human capital formation by young households is constrained by the illiquidity of human wealth. Both endogenous and exogenous growth versions of the basic OLG model are analyzed. We find that intergenerational redistribution policies that discourage physical and capital formation may encourage human capital formation. Despite common technologies and perfect international mobility financial capital, the non-tradedness of human capital and the illiquidity of human wealth makes for persistent differences in productivity growth rates (in the endogenous growth version of the model) or in their levels (in the exogenous growth version). We also consider the productivity growth (or level) effects of public spending on education and of the distortionary taxation of financial asset income.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Centre for Economic Performance, LSE in its series CEP Discussion Papers with number dp0245.

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Date of creation: May 1995
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Handle: RePEc:cep:cepdps:dp0245

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Web page: http://cep.lse.ac.uk/_new/publications/series.asp?prog=CEP

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Cited by:
  1. Philippe Monfort & David de la Croix, 2000. "Education funding and regional convergence," Journal of Population Economics, Springer, vol. 13(3), pages 403-424.
  2. Erasmo Papagni, 2008. "The Long-run Effects of Household Liquidity Constraints and Taxation on Fertility, Education, Saving, and Growth," Discussion Papers 11_2008, D.E.S. (Department of Economic Studies), University of Naples "Parthenope", Italy.
  3. Thomas Krichel, 1998. "Growing at Different Rates," School of Economics Discussion Papers 9801, School of Economics, University of Surrey.
  4. Simone Valente, 2005. "Tax policy and human capital formation with public investment in education," CER-ETH Economics working paper series 05/41, CER-ETH - Center of Economic Research (CER-ETH) at ETH Zurich.
  5. David, DE LA CROIX, 2004. "Education and Growth with Endogenous Debt Constraints," Discussion Papers (IRES - Institut de Recherches Economiques et Sociales) 2004020, Université catholique de Louvain, Institut de Recherches Economiques et Sociales (IRES).
  6. F. Heylen & L. Pozzi & J. Vandewege, 2004. "Inflation crises, human capital formation and growth," Working Papers of Faculty of Economics and Business Administration, Ghent University, Belgium 04/260, Ghent University, Faculty of Economics and Business Administration.
  7. Freddy Heylen & Arne Schollaert & Gerdie Everaert & Lorenzo Pozzi, 2004. "Inflation and human capital formation: theory and panel data evidence," Money Macro and Finance (MMF) Research Group Conference 2003 43, Money Macro and Finance Research Group.

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