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Developing Country Interests in Agricultural Trade Reform

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Author Info

  • Rod Tyers

    (Department of Economics, University of Adelaide)

Abstract

This paper examines whether developing countries, as a group, would be better off in the absence of agricultural protection in the industrial North and, if so, whether they should support reforms negotiated between the major players in the Uruguay Round. Results from the Tyers-Anderson GLS model of world food markets suggest that the net effect of industrial country agricultural protection is beneficial to developing countries, though by only a small margin, even if its removal were to stimulate accelerated technical change in developing countries. The same is found to be true of partial reforms which are more palatable politically, such as quotas to reduce oversupply in the EC. Of course, many developing countries, including those which are members of the Cairns Group, are badly hurt by protection in the North. Unfortunately, however, they and the other members of that group stand to gain comparatively little from the reduction of oversupply in the EC through quotas.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by University of Adelaide, School of Economics in its series School of Economics Working Papers with number 1988-02.

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Length: 25 pages
Date of creation: 1988
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:adl:wpaper:1988-02

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Postal: Adelaide SA 5005
Phone: (618) 8303 5540
Web page: http://www.economics.adelaide.edu.au/
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Related research

Keywords: agriculture; agricultural economics; trade;

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References

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  1. Daniel M. Otto & William H. Meyers, 1986. "Impacts of the Food Security Act of 1985 on Iowa Agriculture," Food and Agricultural Policy Research Institute (FAPRI) Publications 86-sr33, Food and Agricultural Policy Research Institute (FAPRI) at Iowa State University.
  2. William H. Meyers & Michael D. Helmar, 1986. "Trade Implications of the Food Security Act of 1985," Food and Agricultural Policy Research Institute (FAPRI) Publications 86-sr4, Food and Agricultural Policy Research Institute (FAPRI) at Iowa State University.
  3. Meyers, William H., 1986. "Food Security Act of 1985 One Year Later: Implications and Persistent Problems," Staff General Research Papers 10922, Iowa State University, Department of Economics.
  4. Tyers, Rodney, 1985. "International Impacts of protection: model structure and results for FC agricultural policy," Journal of Policy Modeling, Elsevier, vol. 7(2), pages 219-251.
  5. Ahmad, Ehtisham & Stern, Nicholas, 1984. "The theory of reform and indian indirect taxes," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 25(3), pages 259-298, December.
  6. Koester, Ulrich, 1982. "Policy options for the grain economy of the European Community: implications for developing countries," Research reports 35, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
  7. Daniel M. Otto & William H. Meyers, 1986. "Impacts of the Food Security Act of 1985 on Iowa Agriculture," Center for Agricultural and Rural Development (CARD) Publications 86-sr33, Center for Agricultural and Rural Development (CARD) at Iowa State University.
  8. William H. Meyers & Michael D. Helmar, 1986. "Trade Implications of the Food Security Act of 1985," Center for Agricultural and Rural Development (CARD) Publications 86-sr4, Center for Agricultural and Rural Development (CARD) at Iowa State University.
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Citations

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Cited by:
  1. Rodney Tyers, 1991. "On The Neglect Of Dynamics, Risk And Market Insulation In The Analysis Of Uruguay Round Food Trade Reforms," Australian Journal of Agricultural and Resource Economics, Australian Agricultural and Resource Economics Society, vol. 35(3), pages 295-313, December.
  2. Tyers, Rodney, 1990. "Searching Under The Light: The Neglect Of General Equilibrium, Dynamics And Risk In The Analysis Of Food Trade Reforms," Staff Papers 13845, University of Minnesota, Department of Applied Economics.
  3. Hartmann, Monika & Schmitz, P. Michael, 1991. "Impact Of Ec'S Rebalancing Strategy On Developing Countries: The Case Of Feed," Staff Papers 14085, University of Minnesota, Department of Applied Economics.

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